There are 2 definitions of dodder in English:

dodder1

Syllabification: dod·der
Pronunciation: /ˈdädər
 
/

verb

[no object]
Tremble or totter, typically because of old age: spent and nerve-weary, I doddered into the foyer of a third-rate hotel (as adjective doddering) that doddering old fool
More example sentences
  • The Levi's name has grown into doddering old age in a brutally competitive apparel market.
  • They come on Uncle Junior's recommendation, but they prove to be doddering old fools with bad or no eyesight.
  • He is famous for doddering around with a camera crew in tow, picking up strange slithery beasts that look like they might bite him and poking sticks at them.
Synonyms

Origin

early 17th century: variant of obsolete dialect dadder; related to dither.

Derivatives

dodderer

noun
More example sentences
  • Often dismissed as wrinklies and fogeys, dodderers and ditherers, it turns out that the company's target audience are, in fact, among the biggest consumers in the country.
  • A government member labelled the retired military chiefs & diplomats as old dodderers.
  • I have yet to discover that having been born when Cal Coolidge was gearing up to run for re-election confers any eminence upon this dodderer.

doddery

adjective
More example sentences
  • It was regarded as a family firm - a bit slow and doddery but a caring and kind place to work.
  • The difference is that now they have weak-kneed, wobbly, doddery leadership and they are falling over.
  • He's a bit slower physically but he's not doddery, so I decided not to go that way with Cecil.

Definition of dodder in:

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Pronunciation: ɪˈpɪlɪən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 2 definitions of dodder in English:

dodder2

Syllabification: dod·der
Pronunciation: /ˈdädər
 
/

noun

A widely distributed parasitic climbing plant of the morning glory family, with leafless threadlike stems that are attached to the host plant by means of suckers.
  • Genus Cuscuta, family Convolvulaceae
More example sentences
  • Eventually a mat of stems forms around the host plant and the dodder loses contact with the soil.
  • By tying suitable stem explants of dodder to touch the host, Kelly observed that 60% of individuals rejected suitable hosts within several hours.
  • Because C. arvensis is more closely related to the dodders than is tobacco, C. arvensis was also used as a control.

Origin

Middle English: related to Middle Low German doder, dodder, Middle High German toter.

Definition of dodder in:

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Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: ɪˈpɪlɪən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...