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dramaturgy

Syllabification: dram·a·tur·gy
Pronunciation: /ˈdraməˌtərjē
 
/

Definition of dramaturgy in English:

noun

The theory and practice of dramatic composition: studies of Shakespeare’s dramaturgy
More example sentences
  • There's been a revolution in dramaturgy and theatre style from the 20s onward.
  • It is true, of course, that Shakespeare's dramaturgy allows him soliloquies and asides that make it easier to dramatize thought, but Hamlet's thoughts are still necessarily externalized.
  • That the tautness among these four grows steadily throughout the play, however, renders the crisis static and unobtrusive, and in this light the play's structure invites comparison to Chekhovian dramaturgy.

Derivatives

dramaturgic

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • And Ayckbourn's triune contribution is worthy of that master's dramaturgic know-how.
  • Lincoln was not about to pass up the lifetime opportunity this dramaturgic delay facilitated.

dramaturgical

2
Pronunciation: /ˌdräməˈtərjikəl/
adjective
Example sentences
  • I think he has a dramaturgical role, one of social perspective and counseling.
  • I have a strong dramaturgical sense of realizing the playwright's vision.
  • We designed the conference scenario after the dramaturgical structure of a Brechtian play.

dramaturgically

3
Pronunciation: /ˌdräməˈtərjik(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • The story of our life may be dramaturgically prolonged (and the collection contains a textbook's worth of ‘incremental perturbations’), but the ‘story of our life,’ the couple realize, ‘is not our life; it is our story.’
  • However I found it dramaturgically clumsy, and as a whole, the ballet had less power than Alfred Rodrigues's 1953 work on the same subject.
  • Krainik proved to be just as tough as Fox but, crucially, more gifted in administration and development and with much more catholic tastes musically and dramaturgically.

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