There are 3 main definitions of dun in English:

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dun1

Syllabification: dun
Pronunciation: /dən
 
/

adjective

1Of a dull grayish-brown color: a dun cow
More example sentences
  • The prevailing greyish dun distances were relieved by colour, by small spots of cheerful intimacy in patches of cultivation the more precious for being sustained in such arduous circumstances.
  • Into this dun world steps the elegant and cultured woman with vague ambitions to ‘tame inner-city thugs with recitations of poetry.’
  • In literature the era of ‘offensively Australian’ nationalism and tediously dun naturalism was over.
Synonyms
grayish-brown, brownish, mousy, muddy, khaki, umber
1.1 literary Dark; dusky: when the dun evening comes

noun

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1A dull grayish-brown color.
Example sentences
  • A mutt the colour of dun stood near by, barking every now and again.
  • Surrounding the cone on three sides were high walls of volcanic rock forming an amphitheater almost a mile and a half wide, a subtle palette of dun, gray, and beige.
2A thing that is dun in color, in particular.
2.1A horse with a sandy or sandy-gray coat, black mane, tail, and lower legs, and a dark dorsal stripe.
Example sentences
  • She was his mount, a unicorn mare with a dun's coat.
  • The Indians ride bareback on paints (white horses with dark colored markings) and duns (grayish brown horses) with snaffle bridles.
  • Three women were working in the kitchen and a man was sitting at the table, sipping black coffee from a cup bigger than the dun's hoof.
2.2A sub-adult mayfly, which has drab coloration and opaque wings.
Example sentences
  • In July the three creeks - DePuy's, Nelson's, and Armstrong's - produce clouds of mayflies called pale morning duns, which draw monster rainbows to the surface.
  • Later they take the emerging fly, the hatched dun (or ‘green drakes’) and the ovipositing (egg laying) spinner.
  • But they can live for a week in the preceding stage, as winged, asexual duns; and before then, some live underwater for two or three years as nymphs.

Origin

Old English dun, dunn, of Germanic origin; probably related to dusk.

More
  • donkey from (late 18th century):

    Before the late 18th century a donkey was an ass. At first the word donkey was used only in slang and dialect, and its origin is lost. Early references indicate that it rhymed with monkey, and this has prompted some to suggest that it comes from the colour dun (Old English) or from the man's name Duncan. The expression for donkey's years, ‘for a very long time’, is a pun referring to the length of a donkey's ears and playing on an old pronunciation of ears which was the same as that of years. The British expression yonks, with the same meaning, may derive from it. See also easel

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There are 3 main definitions of dun in English:

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dun2

Syllabification: dun
Pronunciation: /dən
 
/

verb (duns, dunning, dunned)

[with object]
Make persistent demands on (someone), especially for payment of a debt: they would very likely start dunning you for payment of your taxes (as adjective dunning) she received two dunning letters from the bank
More example sentences
  • Have I decided to stop dunning you for contributions?
  • They had been dunning me for a £10 bill I had naively thought I would leave to the next serious accounting.
  • The Vendome incident would haunt him for a long time, since well after he had served his prison sentence the Republican government would be dunning him for 500,000 francs, the cost of restoring the column.
Synonyms

noun

archaic Back to top  
1.1A demand for payment.
Example sentences
  • They start off with a dun from distributors for $2 at the door.

Origin

early 17th century (as a noun): from obsolete Dunkirk privateer, from the French port of Dunkirk.

More
  • donkey from (late 18th century):

    Before the late 18th century a donkey was an ass. At first the word donkey was used only in slang and dialect, and its origin is lost. Early references indicate that it rhymed with monkey, and this has prompted some to suggest that it comes from the colour dun (Old English) or from the man's name Duncan. The expression for donkey's years, ‘for a very long time’, is a pun referring to the length of a donkey's ears and playing on an old pronunciation of ears which was the same as that of years. The British expression yonks, with the same meaning, may derive from it. See also easel

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There are 3 main definitions of dun in English:

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dun3

Line breaks: dun

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

Archaeology
A stone-built fortified settlement in Scotland or Ireland, of a kind built from the late Iron Age to the early Middle Ages. The word is a frequent place-name element in Scotland and Ireland.

Origin

late 18th century: from Irish dún, Scottish Gaelic dùn 'hill or hill fort'.

More
  • donkey from (late 18th century):

    Before the late 18th century a donkey was an ass. At first the word donkey was used only in slang and dialect, and its origin is lost. Early references indicate that it rhymed with monkey, and this has prompted some to suggest that it comes from the colour dun (Old English) or from the man's name Duncan. The expression for donkey's years, ‘for a very long time’, is a pun referring to the length of a donkey's ears and playing on an old pronunciation of ears which was the same as that of years. The British expression yonks, with the same meaning, may derive from it. See also easel

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