Definition of emotivism in English:

emotivism

Syllabification: e·mo·tiv·ism
Pronunciation: /iˈmotiˌvizəm
 
/

noun

Philosophy
An ethical theory that regards ethical and value judgments as expressions of feeling or attitude and prescriptions of action, rather than assertions or reports of anything.
More example sentences
  • There's little indication of the available range of ethical theories, from crude emotivism to Platonic realism, from McDowellian objectivism to virtue theory.
  • If so, simple emotivism of the sort described is refuted because the sincerity conditions for making the judgement require the motivation not present in the amoralist.
  • The logical positivists who dealt with ethics put forward a view called emotivism.

Derivatives

emotivist

noun
More example sentences
  • Whether this is sufficient to count such theories as emotivist or non-cognitivist is open to dispute, but many proponents of such views do call themselves non-cognitivists and emotivists.
  • He put forward an emotivist theory of ethics, one that he never abandoned.
  • Spinoza gave what would now be called an emotivist theory of moral judgement.

Definition of emotivism in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgʌz(ə)l
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily