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empathy

Syllabification: em·pa·thy
Pronunciation: /ˈempəTHē
 
/

Definition of empathy in English:

noun

The ability to understand and share the feelings of another.
Example sentences
  • Such a metaphor betrays a complete lack of understanding, of empathy with Victorian culture.
  • There is a frightening lack of empathy and of understanding of the condition of the elderly.
  • A little bit of empathy and understanding might go a long way in making their life easier.

Origin

early 20th century: from Greek empatheia (from em- 'in' + pathos 'feeling') translating German Einfühlung.

More
  • pathetic from (late 16th century):

    ‘Affecting the emotions’ was the early sense of pathetic which came via late Latin from Greek pathētikos ‘sensitive’, based on pathos ‘suffering’ (M17th in English). Apathy (early 17th century) is from apathēs ‘without feeling’, and empathy (from em- ‘in’ and pathos ‘feeling’) was coined by physiologists in the early 20th century. See also sympathy

Words that rhyme with empathy

apathytelepathy

Definition of empathy in:

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Word of the day emulous
Pronunciation: ˈɛmjʊləs
adjective
seeking to emulate someone or something