Definition of entrap in English:

entrap

Syllabification: en·trap
Pronunciation: /inˈtrap
 
, enˈtrap
 
/

verb (entraps, entrapping, entrapped)

[with object]
1Catch (someone or something) in or as in a trap: she was entrapped by family expectations
More example sentences
  • The opening of the piece begins with the piano and slowly entraps the ‘voices’ of the string duo, creating a light, enchanting mood that takes on a life all its own.
  • The French philosopher is best known for his theory that consumer society forms a kind of code that gives individuals the illusion of choice while in fact entrapping them in a vast web of simulated reality.
  • With the canopy of a star-spangled sky, the frozen stillness of stone entrapping centuries of history, and the soft sound of the waters, it is truly an experience that belongs to the realm of the unforgettable.
Synonyms
1.1Trick or deceive (someone), especially by inducing them to commit a crime in order to secure their prosecution.
More example sentences
  • Now imagine a police force with the power to entrap you into crime in order to arrest you.
  • The newspapers would occasionally report on famous people entrapped by the police and tried for crimes.
  • She said there would also need to be safeguards in using surveillance recordings in court as evidence so that the person accused had the opportunity to explain what he allegedly said and the surveillance was not used to entrap the person.
Synonyms
entice, lure, inveigle;
bait, decoy, trap;
lead on, trick, deceive, dupe, hoodwink, sting
informal set up, frame

Origin

mid 16th century: from Old French entraper, from en- 'in' + trappe 'a trap'.

Derivatives

entrapment

noun
More example sentences
  • That's an average of about 42 entrapments a year.
  • A number of conditions are required to increase the likelihood that psychological entrapment will occur.
  • It actually has a physical effect on me, a claustrophobic entrapment that leaves me gasping for the clean air of silence.

entrapper

noun

Definition of entrap in:

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