Definition of erect in English:

erect

Syllabification: e·rect
Pronunciation: /əˈrekt
 
/

adjective

1Rigidly upright or straight: she stood erect with her arms by her sides
More example sentences
  • Remembering to keep your body straight, head erect, arms straight and to the sides or above the head, is really quite difficult.
  • The upright beam was held erect with guys, while the oblique arm or boom hoisted and swung the stone into position.
  • Stand up straight - studies show that if you stand upright with your head erect, smile and breathe deeply, it is almost impossible to ‘feel’ depressed.
Synonyms
upright, straight, vertical, perpendicular; standingbristling, standing on end, upright
1.1(Of the penis, clitoris, or nipples) enlarged and rigid, especially in sexual excitement.
More example sentences
  • A condom is a thin sheath, usually made out of latex, which is rolled onto an erect penis before sexual contact.
  • The worn T-shirt she wore did nothing to conceal the fact that Jess was cold, her hard, erect nipples pressing against the soft cotton of her shirt.
  • Such women as these emasculate the male sexual drive, they reduce the man's erect penis to a limp one!
Synonyms
engorged, enlarged, swollen, tumescent; hard, stiff, rigid

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Construct (a building, wall, or other upright structure): the guest house was erected in the eighteenth century the police had erected roadblocks
More example sentences
  • The bill includes the cost of erecting the various building structures as well as expenditure related to yesterday's elaborate festival programme.
  • More than two-thirds of Jack's mature and sheltered garden will disappear this week when builders move in to erect a wall along Anderson's boundary.
  • If a builder erects a structure containing a latent defect which renders it dangerous to persons or property, he will be liable in tort for injury to persons or damage to property resulting from that dangerous defect.
Synonyms
1.1Create or establish (a theory or system): the party that erected the welfare state
More example sentences
  • Yet Mr Newbury erects a baffling theory, accusing Chalky of saying that the cement works does no harm.
  • They were not but, your Honour, what was happening was that they were erecting a contractual system and qualifying it.
  • Thus Huxley's attempt to erect a system of contractual rights in place of ‘natural rights’ must collapse.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin erect- 'set up', from the verb erigere, from e- (variant of ex-) 'out' + regere 'to direct'.

Derivatives

erectable

adjective
More example sentences
  • After World War II there was a boom of this very type, offered on a large scale at affordable prices and in obsessively homogeneous prototypes, easily transportable and erectable.
  • This family of tents will be a series of quickly erectable tents designed to be used either in a stand-alone mode or connected to other tents.
  • The radar's erectable antenna is up to 13m high.

erectly

adverb
More example sentences
  • In manner Colonel Wayne Everson is dignified and carries himself erectly with a military bearing.
  • Boule concluded that Neandertal man could not have walked erectly, but rather must have walked in a clumsy fashion.
  • Many grasses grow erectly, but others flow outward in a graceful vase or fountain shape.

erectness

noun
More example sentences
  • Hosfield transferred the genes for erectness, canning quality, and virus resistance into red bean germplasm.
  • As they stood in a gallery where Sheetrock walls meet steel floor plates without baseboard or molding, they mediated gently, calling attention to proportions and borders and to the propriety of erectness.
  • Concomitantly, most favored female bodies with rounded chests that were attributable, in part, to an erectness of figure that also was considered essential to female beauty.

Definition of erect in:

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adjective
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