Definition of exclude in English:

exclude

Syllabification: ex·clude
Pronunciation: /ikˈsklo͞od
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Deny (someone) access to or bar (someone) from a place, group, or privilege: women had been excluded from many scientific societies
More example sentences
  • You are excluded from the United Kingdom at the personal direction of the Secretary of State.
  • Frankly, we find it hard to accept that either of the reasons put forward by your clients amounts to the real reason why Mr Wilson was excluded from the Folkestone Police Station.
  • As already mentioned, he was excluded from Whitton High School by letter from the Head Teacher.
Synonyms
keep out, deny access to, shut out, debar, disbar, bar, ban, prohibit, ostracized
1.1Keep (something) out of a place: apply flux to exclude oxygen
More example sentences
  • They migrate throughout the enclosed space, forming an invisible barrier on metal surfaces which excludes the moisture and oxygen which are responsible for corrosion.
  • It is important to note that normal resting oxygenation does not exclude exertional or nocturnal oxygen desaturation.
  • ‘It excludes oxygen, so the propellant is breathed in instead,’ he said.
1.2Remove from consideration; rule out: computer software is excluded from the mandatory 15-year write-off
More example sentences
  • If affordable housing is to be made available in this community, no options should be excluded without careful consideration.
  • On the flip side, an auditor is punished, in a sense, for being diligent by excluding himself from consideration for certain good jobs.
  • Once those 15 were excluded, only two possibilities were left in parliament.
1.3Prevent the occurrence of; preclude: clauses seeking to exclude liability for loss or damage
More example sentences
  • We cannot exclude further occurrences of outbreaks in poultry and other birds in other areas of the European Union.
  • That clause excludes liability for loss and nuisance caused by environmental pollution except when it arises from a sudden event which is unintentional and unforeseen.
  • Active tuberculosis must be excluded before beginning preventive therapy.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin excludere, from ex- 'out' + claudere 'to shut'.

Phrases

law (or principle) of the excluded middle

Logic The principle that one (and one only) of two contradictory propositions must be true.
More example sentences
  • This is likely because in logic a paradox is going to be translated as a strict contradiction - a clear violation of the law of the excluded middle.
  • In his Hamburg lecture in 1921, Hilbert first presented the idea of using choice functions to deal with the principle of the excluded middle in a formal system for arithmetic.
  • In 1913 Lesniewski published an article on the law of the excluded middle, then in the following year a publication on Russell's paradox.

Derivatives

excludable

adjective
More example sentences
  • Indeed, one of the functions of entrepreneurs, as opposed to academics, is to figure out how to make a public good into an excludable private good.
  • Wires are rivalrous and excludable, and the companies invested a great deal of money laying them.
  • Whether or not the cost of value of the course is excludable from wages to the employee depends on various factors.

excluder

noun
More example sentences
  • Following standard procedures, the test frames were placed above the queen excluder in each queenright discriminator colony and sandwiched between two frames containing brood of all ages (eggs, larvae, and pupae).
  • The National Marine Fisheries Service will provide the aquariums with a turtle excluder, a device required on ocean shrimp trawls.
  • In May 1990, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that as many as 55,000 sea turtles annually drown in American shrimp nets not equipped with turtle excluder device that allow turtles to escape the trawl net.

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