Definition of exquisite in English:

exquisite

Syllabification: ex·quis·ite
Pronunciation: /ekˈskwizit, ˈekskwizit
 
/

adjective

1Extremely beautiful and, typically, delicate: exquisite, jewellike portraits
More example sentences
  • Executed with breathlessly fine strokes, these exquisite images are as beautiful and accomplished as line drawings by Picasso or Matisse.
  • Her fine exquisite features and extremely pale skin were making her look as a statue made by a sculptor master.
  • Their delicate and exquisite prints, some of which use gampi paper as their base, sell for very reasonable prices, an opportunity that may not last.
Synonyms
beautiful, lovely, elegant, fine; magnificent, superb, excellent, wonderful, ornate, well crafted, well made, perfect; delicate, fragile, dainty, subtle
1.1Intensely felt: the most exquisite kind of agony
More example sentences
  • These sorts of wounds are sharp, quick, and part of the game's exquisite agonies.
  • It's a form of exquisite torture watching George and Martha torment each other, and occasionally this becomes tiresome.
  • It's like tapping a spoon on a bad tooth, exquisite agony.
Synonyms
intense, acute, keen, piercing, sharp, severe, racking, excruciating, agonizing, harrowing, searing; unbearable, unendurable
1.2Highly sensitive or discriminating: her exquisite taste in painting
More example sentences
  • Soprano Juliane Banse's fruity voice is neither childish nor stereotypically innocent, but her diction and sensitivity to words are exquisite.
  • The exquisite sensitivity of the nose can be defeated by a common cold.
  • Happily, the technology is now doing its job, collecting data methodically and with exquisite sensitivity.
Synonyms
discriminating, discerning, sensitive, selective, fastidious; refined, cultivated, cultured, educated

noun

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A man who is affectedly concerned with his clothes and appearance; a dandy.
More example sentences
  • Using brightly coloured, almost grotesque distortion of an individual's salient features, he targeted the royal family, politicians, society figures, exquisites, and charlatans.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'carefully ascertained, precise'): from Latin exquisit- 'sought out', from the verb exquirere, from ex- 'out' + quaerere 'seek'.

Derivatives

exquisitely

adverb
More example sentences
  • The suggested white was a dream, the red equally sublime, but the exquisitely soft, peach coloured rose was the crowning glory.
  • Like everything that followed, it was exquisitely presented and fantastically flavoursome.
  • Sublimely funny and exquisitely sad, this might just turn out to be an American classic.

exquisiteness

noun
More example sentences
  • People from all walks of life were present at the cocktail and happily sampled the exquisiteness of Indian cuisine.
  • Too bad we live in a part of the world that often covers our eyes from its skies with a thick wall of dust, keeping the exquisiteness of the twinkling stars for itself.
  • It has the elements required to be spectacular, but it is lacking the exquisiteness that is associated with ballet.

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