Definition of extrapolate in English:

extrapolate

Syllabification: ex·trap·o·late
Pronunciation: /ikˈstrapəˌlāt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Extend the application of (a method or conclusion, especially one based on statistics) to an unknown situation by assuming that existing trends will continue or similar methods will be applicable: the results cannot be extrapolated to other patient groups [no object]: it is always dangerous to extrapolate from a sample
More example sentences
  • The book is of broader relevance than just the tea industry, however, and the problems identified and the methods suggested can certainly be extrapolated to other situations.
  • It can also be extrapolated to a marital situation.
  • The results of a retrospective analysis are specific to the observed variation in the vital rates, and can be extrapolated to other situations only with great care.
1.1Estimate or conclude (something) by extrapolating: attempts to extrapolate likely human cancers from laboratory studies
More example sentences
  • Using this relationship, we extrapolated the estimated time of divergence from adjusted measures of pairwise differences between Dendropoma species.
  • The figures are extrapolated from forecasts in the Barker Report, which made recommendations into the number of new homes which needed to be built to bring Britain's house price inflation in line with that of Europe.
  • During that time, I've seen numerous threat briefings that attempted to extrapolate possible terrorist strategies out of the most obscure bits of intelligence.
1.2 Mathematics Extend (a graph, curve, or range of values) by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data: (as adjective extrapolated) a set of extrapolated values
More example sentences
  • The final slope of all the complex curves extrapolate at the intercept to an average value of 1.5 0.5.
  • This is done by extrapolating a graph of volume against temperature.
  • Turgid weight was estimated from the linear relationship between fresh weight and x in the positive turgor range, by extrapolating to x = 0.

Origin

late 19th century: from extra- 'outside' + a shortened form of interpolate.

Derivatives

extrapolation

Pronunciation: /ikˌstrapəˈlāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • Most importantly, it is not a matter to which the hypotheses and extrapolations of the opposition can be applied with any seriousness whatsoever as they have been in this chamber today.
  • He insisted that the data supplied by the claimants rested ‘on surmise and inapposite extrapolations from animal studies and industrial accidents’.
  • Well, I don't know that I necessarily agree with the projections or extrapolations that you just set forth.

extrapolative

Pronunciation: /-ˌlātiv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • What they did was approach American folk and roots music with the precision and extrapolative inventiveness of jazz.
  • In particular, investors may follow a ‘momentum’ model of buying and selling currencies, so that once a movement gets going, it tends to generate an extrapolative dynamic of its own.
  • As Kantrowitz notes, male students are extrapolative, and leap forward into technical learning for its own sake.

extrapolator

Pronunciation: /-ˌlātər/
noun
More example sentences
  • But the consumer debt-to-income ratio, like the simplistic P / E-to-growth rate comparison, will bury the extrapolators at key inflection points.
  • This paper considers the problem of limited angle tomography in which a complete sinogram is not available and proposes a linear extrapolator to extrapolate the missing part of the sinogram.
  • The second aspect covers the steps to make the extrapolator fully adaptive, through optimization of the time step sensitivity and the input layer width of a sliding window extrapolator.

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