Definition of far in English:

far

Syllabification: far
Pronunciation: /fär
 
/

adverb (farther /ˈfärT͟Hər/, farthest /ˈfärT͟Həst/ or further /ˈfərT͟Hər/, furthest /ˈfərT͟Həst/)

1 [often with adverbial] At, to, or by a great distance (used to indicate the extent to which one thing is distant from another): it was not too far away the mountains far in the distance glowed in the sun
More example sentences
  • Mist fills the middle ground, and the background mountains appear to be far in the distance.
  • Your thoughts can take a course of their own and connect two points or places far apart in both distance and time.
  • The horizon is low, the masts and hulks of the ships making a series of horizontals and verticals receding far into the distance.
Synonyms
a long way, a great distance, a good way;
2Over a large expanse of space or time: he had not traveled far figurative that’s the reason why we have come so far and done as well as we have
More example sentences
  • You did not always have to travel that far to see the wildlife.
  • Do Italian women have to travel that far to find such garish outfits?
  • Because its pollen is heavy and will not travel far, its seed will produce good results.
Synonyms
to a certain extent, up to a point, to a degree, within reason, within limits
3By a great deal: he is able to function far better than usual the reality has fallen far short of early expectations
More example sentences
  • While an improvement on the previous plan, it still falls far short of acceptable.
  • This, frankly, falls far short of what the minister and the voters require.
  • We had far more calls than usual and couldn't take them all to air, which is always a good sign.
Synonyms

adjective

[attributive] Back to top  
1Situated at a great distance in space or time: the far reaches of the universe
More example sentences
  • A pair of conical shapes away in the far distance had me confused before I realised they must be the Paps of Jura.
  • Yet here in the far reaches of the European world, such conceptions of love are dragged back into the shadows.
  • It was all about the people and their historic journey into the far reaches of space.
Synonyms
1.1More distant than another object of the same kind: he was standing in the far corner
More example sentences
  • His low, hard shot to the far corner of the net gives Houlihan no chance.
  • The midfielder, revelling in a more advanced role, chested the ball down and lashed it into the far corner of the net with his left foot.
  • He took one touch and then tucked the ball neatly and unstoppably into the far corner.
1.2Distant from a point seen as central; extreme: she was brought up in the far north of Scotland the largest electoral success for the far right since the war
More example sentences
  • The climate of the far north of Italy may be continental while that of central and southern Italy is Mediterranean.
  • The silver must have been imported from the far north, Turkey, maybe even Central Asia.
  • With good British perversity, Sutherland is of course in the far NORTH of Scotland.
Synonyms
further, more distant;
opposite

Origin

Old English feorr; from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit para and Greek pera 'further'.

Phrases

as far as

For as great a distance as: the river stretched away as far as he could see
More example sentences
  • The staff shortage had also been tackled by a major recruitment drive reaching as far as Australia.
  • I wouldn't trust them as far as I could throw them, which is no distance at all.
  • It was dark and brooding and stretched away into the distance as far as Becki could see.
For a great enough distance to reach: I decided to walk as far as the village
More example sentences
  • Plans are also afoot to place a cycle path along the top of the new wall reaching as far as Shoebury East Beach.
  • To do this I had to stand with the pole vertically by my side and reach up as far as I could with my right hand.
  • On the Eden salmon and a few sea trout have reached at least as far as Lazonby Estate.
To the extent that: as far as I am concerned, it is no big deal
More example sentences
  • Well, inequality, which as far as they are both concerned, are one and the same thing.
  • She was dead as far as any of the villagers were concerned, until she went to one house and saw her father.
  • Rather, the Ombudsman now seeks to take each case as far as is necessary for a just resolution to be reached.

be a far cry from

Be very different from: the hotel’s royal suite is a far cry from the poverty of his home country
More example sentences
  • Lama's upbringing was a far cry from his current life as an animal rights activist.
  • For Mrs Bulloch, 30, her role as shop manager is a far cry from her previous job as an air hostess.
  • This is the fifth generation of the Sonata and it is a far cry from the first generation model I found so tempting.

by far

By a great amount: this was by far the largest city in the area
More example sentences
  • This is by far the largest amount of cocaine ever to be seized in Durban, police said.
  • The most toxic substance known by far is the entirely natural botulinum toxin.
  • Honey featured in many drinks because it was by far the most easily available sweetening agent.

far and away

By a great amount: he is far and away the most accomplished player
More example sentences
  • By far and away the most wondrous aspect of PVA is its characteristic of turning to hard solid plastic once dry.
  • In the use of the nutrients that feed our crops, China is now far and away the world leader.
  • I'd been hoping for this, I love Les Mis, it's far and away my favourite musical.

far and near

(also near and far) Everywhere: they came from far and near to New York City
More example sentences
  • He also wanted to thank the clubs loyal supporters, from far and near, who supported the clubs' journey during the year.
  • Sheamie was a gifted piano and accordion player and had his own modern dance band that provided entertainment to many of his old friends far and near.
  • I know people came from far and near to be with us on the night and I can tell you it meant a lot to have so many of our friends celebrating with us and enjoying themselves.
Synonyms
everywhere, [here, there, and everywhere], far and wide, all over (the world), throughout the land, worldwide
all over the map

far and wide

Over a large area: the high plains where bison roamed far and wide
More example sentences
  • Now I could go with my friends and we roamed far and wide, often taking a picnic with us.
  • The bloggers scour far and wide for news reports and bring the most salient ones to the attention of their readers.
  • Few had ever seen her, though tales of her strength, her beauty and her generous gifts spread far and wide.

far be it from me to

Used to express reluctance, especially to do something that one thinks may be resented: far be it from me to speculate on his reasons
More example sentences
  • And if the bosses - far be it for me to make a decision on behalf of the bosses - found it in their heart to actually donate all of the advertising revenue, I reckon that'd be sensational.
  • Now far be it for me to advise people with huge reputations in fitness and team preparation, but proper man management and different training methods must come into play for different players and players of varied ages.
  • Well, they've done their security assessment and they've come to their judgments and far be it for me to second guess them.

far from

Very different from being; tending to the opposite of: conditions were far from satisfactory
More example sentences
  • Players are so in fear of stepping out of line off the pitch they are far from relaxed by the time they step onto it.
  • While this is a far from perfect democratic election, the genie may well be out of the bottle.
  • I'd love to tell you all about it in fine detail but one-handed typing is far from fun.
Synonyms
not, not at all, nowhere near;
the opposite of, the antithesis of, anything but

far gone

In a bad or worsening state, especially so as to be beyond recovery: a few frames from the original film were too far gone to salvage
More example sentences
  • The groundfishery is simply too far gone to recover.
  • I've always been a big fan of biking, but when I found out that my old road bike was finally too far gone to be resurrected, it was time to shop around for a new one.
  • A container of Dutch-style feta cheese that I was really looking forward to having, and which turned out to be very far gone - fizzy in fact!
Advanced in time: the legislative session is too far gone for the lengthy hearings needed to pass the bill
More example sentences
  • Now that the semester's too far gone for students to feel like they're just testing out this university, all sorts of behaviours odd and disquieting are emerging.
  • Well, the subsequent email exchange went as follows, and I think it just goes to show how far gone into the world of email communication and pop culture references we post Gen-X kids are.
  • The season is too far gone for the vote of confidence.

go far

1Achieve a great deal: he was the bright one, and everyone was sure he would go far
More example sentences
  • He has dyslexia and therefore he didn't not go far in school having achieved only grade 3 by the age of 14.
  • It explained, in particular, that the establishment of an international tribunal would go far toward the achievement of this aim.
  • I like the idea, but I'm not sure he's going far on that.
Synonyms
be successful, succeed, prosper, flourish, thrive, get on, get on in the world, make good, set the world on fire
informal make a name for oneself, make one's mark, go places, do all right for oneself, find a place in the sun
be successful, succeed, be a success, do well, get on, get somewhere, get ahead, make good
2Contribute greatly: a book that goes far toward bridging the gap
More example sentences
  • In doing so, the Los Angeles Times noted, he goes far toward ‘uncovering a new thesis about where American pop culture is heading.’
  • Indeed, Menand's enthusiasm for commercialism and pop culture goes far toward explaining why his work seems so acquiescent.
  • This arrangement goes far toward reducing the characteristic unsightly bulge and, as I was to learn later, eliminates any tendency of the rig to change positions once in place.
3Be worth or amount to much: the money would not go far at this year’s prices
More example sentences
  • But McLean says that money likely won't go far, and similar problems will undoubtedly dog other communities in the future.
  • But because the loans are small, sometimes $50 or $100, the money goes far.
  • That's a lot of money to spend on the economy, and it goes far in restaurants and shops in Misawa City and other towns outside the base.

go so far as to do something

Do something regarded as extreme: surely they wouldn’t go so far as to break in?
More example sentences
  • He went so far as to propose a public transportation system to provide access to this wilderness.
  • This summer one person even went so far as to throw a beer bottle at me from a passing car.
  • My mother even went so far as to put up a naughty and nice chart on the fridge door, with a gold star system.

go too far

Exceed the limits of what is reasonable or acceptable.
More example sentences
  • When she challenges him he admonishes her for going too far, for crossing the limits, for not respecting boundaries.
  • Some of his comments were justified but the article went too far when it suggested that the road was built was to accommodate developers.
  • Lucas went too far with the wizardry, creating an unpalatable film.
Synonyms
go to extremes, go overboard, overdo it, go over the top, not know when to stop

how far

1Used to ask how great a distance is: they wanted to know how far he could travel
More example sentences
  • If aviation fuel is noticeable at this distance from Gatwick, how far does it extend?
  • I know there are buses, but how far is it to walk?
  • How far is it around the lakes?
2To what extent: he was not sure how far she was committed
More example sentences
  • This may have been the decision of one individual, I'm not sure how far it was pursued.
  • Not sure how far he got with it all, but there's a thread about his efforts somewhere about.
  • The increase shows just how far the town has come with regard to its war on litter in recent months.

so far

1To a certain limited extent: the commitment to free trade goes only so far
More example sentences
  • You can stretch the elastic so far but you will get to the point where it snaps.
  • In Egypt's classrooms, lessons go only so far. Parents spend $2.4 billion annually to illegally hire private teachers.
  • Aid will go only so far; trade must do the rest.
2(Of a trend that seems likely to continue) up to this time: we’ve only had one honest man so far
More example sentences
  • This is a strategy that has yielded huge profits so far and can continue to do so.
  • It is believed that a small number of sites have so far been contacted, likely in the tens.
  • Experience so far suggests that house prices are more likely to stagnate than crash.
Synonyms
up to this point, up to now, as yet, thus far, hitherto, up to the present, to date

(in) so far as

To the extent that: it was a windless storm so far as blizzards go

so far, so good

Progress has been satisfactory up to now: “How’s the job going?” “So far, so good.”
More example sentences
  • The operation seems to have gone well and it's a case of so far so good but we will just have to wait and see how he recovers.
  • All right, the sky dims to violet, then the stars come out - so far so good - and someone on a mike begins the prologue but the mike wasn't hooked up right and squeaked and fed back all through the show.
  • Just dropped in to let you know that I'm back, I had a couple of nice safe flights back home, nothing was stolen as far as I can see, no flat tires, all the cars started… so far so good!

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Pronunciation: fləˈdʒɪʃəs
adjective
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