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faux-naïf

Syllabification: faux-na·ïf
Pronunciation: /ˌfōnäˈēf
 
/

Definition of faux-naïf in English:

adjective

(Of a work of art or a person) artificially or affectedly simple or naive: faux-naif pastoralism
More example sentences
  • The author doesn't present himself as something he is not: he does not exaggerate his knowledge of the country and he also steers clear of the irritating faux-naif persona favoured by some travel writers.
  • The show featured the small, richly colored, faux-naif paintings on paper that the playwright completed between 1946 and 1956.
  • A (perhaps the) central question, which divides modern readers into two camps, is how far style and content are really faux-naif and informed by humour and irony.

noun

(faux naif) Back to top  
A person who pretends to be ingenuous: the old device of a faux naif observing his own country as a foreigner

Origin

mid 20th century: from French faux 'false' + naïf 'naive'.

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