There are 5 main definitions of fell in English:

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fell1

Syllabification: fell
Past of fall.

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There are 5 main definitions of fell in English:

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fell2

Syllabification: fell

verb

[with object]
1 (usually be felled) Cut down (a tree).
Example sentences
  • Up on a ridge to the right of us, someone has been felling an oak tree all day.
  • He said about two-acres of mature, ash, sycamore copper beech and oak trees were felled.
  • Is it true that as many as 150 Douglas Fir trees were felled?
Synonyms
cut down, chop down, hack down, saw down, clear
1.1Knock down: strong winds felled power lines figurative corruption that felled the financial system in Thailand
More example sentences
  • In a village near Varna, the wind felled an unfinished wall, which reduced an old house to debris as it fell, said the Civil Defence.
  • The wind then felled it to the ground and it landed on top of a cabin, which contained valuable equipment, and a surrounding fence.
  • Thousands of residents, predominantly those already living in poverty, are now homeless after their communities were felled by the winds.
Synonyms
knock down/over, knock to the ground, strike down, bring down, bring to the ground, prostrate;
knock out, knock unconscious
informal deck, floor, flatten, down, lay out, KO
2 (also flat-fell) Stitch down (the edge of a seam) to lie flat: (as adjective flat-felled) a flat-felled seam
More example sentences
  • A rubber mallet is surprisingly useful in flattening seams or hems on thick fabric or leather and especially on heavy flat-fell seams.
  • Continue around the pockets, trimming away the thicker layers and flat-fell seams.
  • Sew your seams the usual way, finish the raw edges with the serger or zigzag, press to one side, switch to top-stitching thread in the needle, and top-stitch the seams on the outside to resemble flat-felled seams.

noun

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An amount of timber cut.

Origin

Old English fellan, of Germanic origin; related to fall.

More
  • The verb fell meaning ‘to cut down’ is recorded from Old English, and is related to fall. Fell as a noun meaning ‘hill’ is a different word, not found until the Middle Ages. It comes from the Old Norse word for a hill, fjall. Fell as an adjective meaning ‘wicked’ comes from an Old French word meaning ‘wicked’ or ‘a wicked person’, the same root as felon (Middle English) and felony (Middle English). Today it is probably most familiar in the phrase at one fell swoop. This originally referred to the sudden descent of a bird of prey in deadly pursuit of its quarry, but came to be used to mean ‘at a single blow’ or ‘all at one go’. In Shakespeare's Macbeth, when Macduff hears that his wife and children have been killed at Macbeth's orders, he cries out, ‘What! All my pretty chickens and their dam / At one fell swoop?’ See also blind

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There are 5 main definitions of fell in English:

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fell3

Syllabification: fell

noun

A hill or stretch of high moorland, especially in northern England: [in place names]: Cross Fell an area of fell and moor
More example sentences
  • On the tops the wind blew hard but the air was clear and the views stretched far over the fells and deep into the valleys.
  • Her work is influenced by the landscape, particularly the northern fells and colourful panoramas of foreign climes.
  • This flora of the fells is found in upland pastures, on barren and dry soil, in heathland and on ledges.

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse fjall, fell 'hill'.

More
  • The verb fell meaning ‘to cut down’ is recorded from Old English, and is related to fall. Fell as a noun meaning ‘hill’ is a different word, not found until the Middle Ages. It comes from the Old Norse word for a hill, fjall. Fell as an adjective meaning ‘wicked’ comes from an Old French word meaning ‘wicked’ or ‘a wicked person’, the same root as felon (Middle English) and felony (Middle English). Today it is probably most familiar in the phrase at one fell swoop. This originally referred to the sudden descent of a bird of prey in deadly pursuit of its quarry, but came to be used to mean ‘at a single blow’ or ‘all at one go’. In Shakespeare's Macbeth, when Macduff hears that his wife and children have been killed at Macbeth's orders, he cries out, ‘What! All my pretty chickens and their dam / At one fell swoop?’ See also blind

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There are 5 main definitions of fell in English:

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fell4

Syllabification: fell

adjective

literary
Of terrible evil or ferocity; deadly: sorcerers use spells to achieve their fell ends
More example sentences
  • Sometimes, the wind also brought unnervingly fell sounds with it, as if a chorus of unholy demons was singing in the distance.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fel, nominative of felon 'wicked (person') (see felon1).

More
  • The verb fell meaning ‘to cut down’ is recorded from Old English, and is related to fall. Fell as a noun meaning ‘hill’ is a different word, not found until the Middle Ages. It comes from the Old Norse word for a hill, fjall. Fell as an adjective meaning ‘wicked’ comes from an Old French word meaning ‘wicked’ or ‘a wicked person’, the same root as felon (Middle English) and felony (Middle English). Today it is probably most familiar in the phrase at one fell swoop. This originally referred to the sudden descent of a bird of prey in deadly pursuit of its quarry, but came to be used to mean ‘at a single blow’ or ‘all at one go’. In Shakespeare's Macbeth, when Macduff hears that his wife and children have been killed at Macbeth's orders, he cries out, ‘What! All my pretty chickens and their dam / At one fell swoop?’ See also blind

Phrases

in (or at) one fell swoop

1
All at one time: nothing can topple the government in one fell swoop
[from Shakespeare's Macbeth ( iv. iii. 219)]
More example sentences
  • Freedom and privacy rarely, if ever, disappear in one fell swoop.
  • And in one fell swoop, all the things I had to remember her by were gone.
  • In one fell swoop fuel has been added to the fire of community disillusion with its political appointees.
Synonyms
all at once, together, at the same time, in one go

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There are 5 main definitions of fell in English:

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fell5

Syllabification: fell

noun

archaic
An animal’s hide or skin with its hair.

Origin

Old English fel, fell, of Germanic origin; from an Indo-European root shared by Latin pellis and Greek pella 'skin'.

More
  • The verb fell meaning ‘to cut down’ is recorded from Old English, and is related to fall. Fell as a noun meaning ‘hill’ is a different word, not found until the Middle Ages. It comes from the Old Norse word for a hill, fjall. Fell as an adjective meaning ‘wicked’ comes from an Old French word meaning ‘wicked’ or ‘a wicked person’, the same root as felon (Middle English) and felony (Middle English). Today it is probably most familiar in the phrase at one fell swoop. This originally referred to the sudden descent of a bird of prey in deadly pursuit of its quarry, but came to be used to mean ‘at a single blow’ or ‘all at one go’. In Shakespeare's Macbeth, when Macduff hears that his wife and children have been killed at Macbeth's orders, he cries out, ‘What! All my pretty chickens and their dam / At one fell swoop?’ See also blind

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