Definition of fictive in English:

fictive

Syllabification: fic·tive
Pronunciation: /ˈfiktiv
 
/

adjective

Creating or created by imagination: the novel’s fictive universe
More example sentences
  • It helps to create a fictive space in which this endless journey acquires mythic dimensions.
  • This political ventriloquism allows the writers ‘both a community and a coherent sense of self - however fictive or imaginative - from which to act and write’.
  • For when Duncan sought out the life of the imagination motivated by the claims of love, and imagined a fictive figure of himself, he proclaimed a poetry of beginnings.

Origin

early 17th century (but rare before the 19th century): from French fictif, -ive or medieval Latin fictivus, from Latin fingere 'contrive, form'.

Derivatives

fictiveness

noun
More example sentences
  • It is precisely this play between fictiveness and fact so characteristic of feature film (in comparison to documentary film, docudrama, or cinema verite) which makes the genre intriguing to Davis.
  • Some cinquecento writers reflected on the fictiveness, pernicious sensuality, and compulsive force of the simulacrum, as it was identified in a long tradition stretching from late antiquity to the Reformation.
  • Woodcock analyses the fictiveness of fairy stories in Spenser's world, basing his approach on recent studies of the ontology of witches.

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