Definition of fiend in English:

fiend

Syllabification: fiend
Pronunciation: /fēnd
 
/

noun

1An evil spirit or demon.
More example sentences
  • The evil that was spawned from Cain became spirits, monsters, fiends, goblins and giants, forging the blood feud between mankind and monster.
  • And with that, she stood up, and walked out into the forest, prepared to battle the evil fairy fiends.
  • Translation: prison guards = evil fiends from Hell that take pleasure in the suffering of others.
Synonyms
demon, devil, evil spirit
informal spook
1.1 (the fiend) archaic The Devil.
More example sentences
  • The Fiend has gone forth by night, and startled thousands in fear and wonder.
  • The summoner refuses, and the fiend drags the summoner off to hell, where all summoners have very special places.
1.2A wicked or cruel person: a fiend thirsty for blood and revenge
More example sentences
  • And don't panic, racist fiends: For now, your chances of getting to marry a white person are still well over 50 percent!
  • When it looks as though all the music, the art, the architecture, the literature - the whole of human civilization - means nothing to the fiends who run the world?
  • How about ‘Columbine,’ the story of how two young teens in love are one day forced to battle evil black coated fiends with only their wits and paper clips.
Synonyms
villain, beast, brute, barbarian, monster, ogre, sadist, evildoer, swine
1.3A person causing mischief or annoyance: you little fiend!
More example sentences
  • And they speak languages other than English, the fiends!
  • I should have known there'd be some clever, evil catch - now I owe those money-hungry fiends down at Australia Post $2!
  • That foolish fiend Richard ‘Lowtax’ Kyanka requested we keep this confounded electronic journal throughout the fortnight.
1.4 informal A person who is excessively fond of or addicted to something: the restaurant’s owner is a wine fiend
More example sentences
  • Two distant older brothers were in Japanese government service but she considered herself an American ‘jazz fiend.’
  • I have to applaud Chris for his miraculous, classy turn-around from drug-riddled dope fiend to responsible father and Broadway star.
  • All the clichés of the form are on display in ‘Plague in the Heartland,’ worn down every bit as smooth as the teeth of a longtime meth fiend.
Synonyms

Origin

Old English fēond 'an enemy, the devil, a demon,' of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vijand and German Feind 'enemy'.

Derivatives

fiendlike

adjective
More example sentences
  • Think of Macbeth's marriage to that "fiendlike" queen of his.
  • Loud above all was the exultant, fiendlike yell of the Confederate soldiers.

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