There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine1

Syllabification: fine
Pronunciation: /fīn
 
/

adjective

1Of high quality: this was a fine piece of filmmaking fine wines
More example sentences
  • Gunner Palace is a fine piece of filmmaking and a fine piece of journalism, and I highly recommend it.
  • This pottery is distinctive because of its high quality, fine decoration, and beautifully curved shapes.
  • Of exceptionally fine quality, it is pyramid-shaped and inset with beaded gold wiring in the shape of a serpent.
Synonyms
excellent, first-class, first-rate, great, exceptional, outstanding, quality, superior, splendid, magnificent, exquisite, choice, select, prime, supreme, superb, wonderful, superlative, of high quality, second to none
1.1(Of a person) worthy of or eliciting admiration: what a fine human being he is
More example sentences
  • The two lads are extremely fine musicians and go down really well at various pub and cabaret venues around the city and county.
  • A fine musician, Eddie had been unable to hit the right notes with his golf until Sunday, when his dedication to the game paid off.
  • A fine singer and musician, he also writes very good songs and is a record producer of considerable note.
Synonyms
worthy, admirable, praiseworthy, laudable, estimable, upright, upstanding, respectable
1.2Good; satisfactory: relations in the group were fine
More example sentences
  • It may be fine to say average rates have been lowered with the various rebates.
  • In fact, just pressing my nose against the window and giving him a double thumbs up satisfies me fine.
  • However, more is fine if you tolerate the higher carbohydrate amount and feel good consuming it.
Synonyms
1.3Used to express one’s agreement with or acquiescence to something: anything you want is fine by me, Linda he said such a solution would be fine
More example sentences
  • Frankly, if there are people on the left or the right that are not sure how he's going to rule on a case, that's fine by me.
  • Any outcome from here on in is fine by me, and I mean that honestly.
  • If you don't get HBO, you're missing a large part of that greatness, which is fine by me.
1.4In good health and feeling well: “I’m fine, just fine. And you?”
More example sentences
  • Frances is on virtually no medication and in fine health.
  • There is no update, he says, other than adding that his health is fine.
  • I presume he's fine, in good health and that, but it's very unlike him to pop off.
Synonyms
in good health, well, healthy, all right, (fighting) fit, as fit as a fiddle, blooming, thriving, in good shape, in good condition, in fine fettle
informal OK, in the pink
1.5(Of the weather) bright and clear: it was another fine winter day
More example sentences
  • Mr Clarke said he walks to work when the weather is fine but in the winter he appreciates being able to call on a lift.
  • Luckily, the weather was fine and some sunshine managed to peek through.
  • The river is still coloured but this is expected to clear over the coming week, if the fine weather forecasted arrives.
Synonyms
fair, dry, bright, clear, sunny, without a cloud in the sky, warm, balmy, summery
1.6Of imposing and dignified appearance or size: a very fine Elizabethan mansion
More example sentences
  • A fine figure of a man, he radiates masculine self-assurance, a quality that interested her greatly.
  • Hence it helps if the actor is a fine figure of a man, of noble countenance and with a beautiful speaking voice.
  • He was a fine figure of a man, she thought and some woman must be missing him.
Synonyms
1.7(Of speech or writing) sounding impressive and grand but ultimately insincere: fine words seemed to produce few practical benefits
More example sentences
  • It is full of grand statements and fine sounding but vague promises to assist working people and the poor.
  • It will be very gratifying indeed to see such a fine speech as that followed up by a vote that is in line with her own rhetoric.
  • I hesitate to interrupt my colleague, because he is giving a very fine speech.
1.8Denoting or displaying a state of good, though not excellent, preservation in stamps, books, coins, etc.
More example sentences
  • Despite the specimen's fine preservation, we are not sure to what species it belongs.
1.9(Of gold or silver) containing a specified high proportion of pure metal: the coin is struck in .986 fine gold
More example sentences
  • They have one of their fine Gold Dots of the same weight and also a 325 gr.
2(Of a thread, filament, or person’s hair) thin: I have always had fine and dry hair
More example sentences
  • Once this is dry, fine threads of beeswax are tightly wound around it.
  • At the mention of its name a thin dog with short fine hair came at attention beside Jen.
  • In places the fine filaments run on top of the thicker filaments, and are thus closer to the plasma membrane.
Synonyms
thin, light, delicate, wispy, flyawaysheer, light, lightweight, thin, flimsy; diaphanous, filmy, gossamer, silky, transparent, translucent, see-through
2.1(Of a point) sharp: I sharpened the leads to a fine point
More example sentences
  • By the time I finished grade school, my sense of dark, black humor had been honed to a fine point.
  • On the outer edges of the sword was shining steel, sharpened to a fine point.
Synonyms
sharp, keen, acute, sharpened, razor-sharp
2.2Consisting of small particles: the soils were all fine silt
More example sentences
  • This groundbait with its very fine particles was designed to catch the tiny little canal roach.
  • The material can range from fine particles to large lumps.
  • Dust and fine sand particles tend to cling to the surface of the skin, especially in the folds and in between the toes and fingers.
Synonyms
fine-grained, powdery, powdered, dusty, ground, crushed
technical comminuted
2.3Having or requiring an intricate delicacy of touch: exquisitely fine work
More example sentences
  • She fingered fine muslins and intricate laces, heavy crimson silks and tulle.
  • The winning hybrids yielded breads with a fine crumb structure and a high overall number of cells.
  • It looks like it is made up of an intricate fine lace expertly spun in glass fibers no thicker than human hair.
Synonyms
delicate, fragile, daintyintricate, delicate, detailed, elaborate, dainty, meticulous
2.4(Of something abstract) subtle and therefore perceived only with difficulty and care: the fine distinctions between the new and old definitions of refugee
More example sentences
  • When the opportunity came I would be fine, I'd be okay because I like to think that I take care of the fine detail in football.
  • Other hypotheses he puts forward also invoke this very fine, subtle matter.
  • It's a fine distinction to be drawn, clearly - but we know that governments have more information than the general public.
Synonyms
subtle, ultra-fine, nice, hair-splitting, nitpicking
2.5(Of feelings) refined; elevated: you might appeal to their finer feelings
More example sentences
  • It was a good lesson that the truth is more important than fine feelings.
  • She begins to shrink from his lack of fine feeling and drunkenness; embittered, she turns their marriage into a battle.
  • The reader will be curious to know where those fine feelings of moral repugnance were when you took the job.

noun

(fines) Back to top  
Very small particles found in mining, milling, etc.
More example sentences
  • It raises dust, separating fines from aggregate.
  • The clay minerals and copious fines reported suggest that blockfields were produced by chemical weathering in a Mediterranean-type climate.
  • Eighteen stalls were randomly bedded with sand or granite fines.

adverb

informal Back to top  
In a satisfactory or pleasing manner; very well: “And how’s the job-hunting going?” “Oh, fine.”
More example sentences
  • He was well liked and fine mannered young man who later secured work in the Bacon Factory where he spent some years.
  • He had had trouble with TelePrompter in the past, he did just fine last night.

verb

Back to top  
1 [with object] Clarify (beer or wine) by causing the precipitation of sediment during production.
More example sentences
  • We fine the wine with egg extracts, so are we to put that on the label?
  • Fish extract is used to fine the wine - to take all the cloudy particles out of it.
  • To ensure clarity and stability, wine often needs to be fined (wine-speak for clarified) and filtered.
1.1 [no object] (Of liquid) become clear: the ale hadn’t had quite time to fine down
More example sentences
  • The heavy rains earlier in the week have added a much needed drop of extra water to our local rivers which should be fining down nicely by the weekend.
  • Wood-matured ports, often called simply wood ports, are aged either in wooden casks or, sometimes, cement tanks, and are ready to drink straight after fining, filtration, and bottling.
2Make or become thinner: [with object]: it can be fined right down to the finished shape [no object]: she’d certainly fined down—her face was thinner
More example sentences
  • In a set of photographs at the end of the book, we see the twins fined down to skin and bone shortly after their release from Kolyma in 1942.
  • He preserved a courtly oblivion towards the event, though it seems beyond reason that he could have not noticed his wife's girth had suddenly fined down.
  • His face was fined down and lost most of its boyishness but his skin was still a dusky gold.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fin, based on Latin finire 'to finish'(see finish).

Phrases

cut it (or things) fine

Allow a very small margin of something, especially time: boys who have cut it rather fine are scuttling into chapel
More example sentences
  • They're cutting things fine in Athens as the jackhammers around the main stadium mix with the sounds of rehearsals for the Opening Ceremony.
  • The airport bus wasn't due to leave for 20 minutes, and it was already 6: 10, which was going to be cutting it fine for a 7pm flight.
  • ‘You're cutting it fine,’ said a thin man with dry lips.

do fine

Be entirely satisfactory: an omelet will do fine
More example sentences
  • Francis says as long as the company's drugs continue to meet the needs of baby boomers, the company will do fine.
Be healthy or well: the baby’s doing fine
More example sentences
  • Luckily, Michael, a trained first-aider knew exactly what to do, and baby Alfie is now doing fine.
  • She needed three attempts at it but was successful and the baby did fine.
  • She said Jake, originally due on August 20th and weighing in at a healthy 6 lbs 11 oz, was doing fine, despite his dramatic entrance into the world.
Do something in a satisfactory manner: he was doing fine acquiring all the necessary disciplines in finance
More example sentences
  • Some of the team did fine without gloves and acquired a few blisters and scrapes during the event.
  • He will do fine, and the department will do fine.
  • The economy is doing fine and, if left alone, will continue to do fine.

do someone fine

Suit or be enough for someone.
More example sentences
  • So it looks like my theory that an 800 seater would do us fine with plenty of room for people who showed up on the day might have been a little over-optimistic.
  • I still ‘sleep fast ‘- 5-6 hours, but it seems to do me fine.’
  • If we finish one place behind the European qualification places it would do me fine.

fine feathers make fine birds

proverb Beautiful clothes or an eye-catching appearance make a person appear similarly beautiful or impressive.

the finer points of

The more complex or detailed aspects of: he went on to discuss the finer points of his work
More example sentences
  • I was discussing the finer points of impeachment, and votes of no confidence.
  • Now their only problem might come from itinerant lawyers wanting to discuss the finer points of local corporate law.
  • I doubt that he knows the finer points of what's proper or not proper.

——'s finest

North American informal The police of a particular city: Moscow’s finest
More example sentences
  • I opened the door to one of our city's finest… the Vancouver Police Department.
  • The inimitable Fish makes several pungent observations on the transgressions of our city 's finest this past holiday.
  • Some of the city's finest were recognized Feb. 7 for their cool heads in the line of duty.

one's finest hour

The time of one’s greatest success.
More example sentences
  • They are nostalgic for their finest hour.
  • Others (the late, great Luis Bunuel for example), however, seem to enjoy their finest hour.
  • And let us not forget their finest hour: the night of treachery 14 years ago that began this whole unhappy saga

fine words butter no parsnips

proverb Nothing is achieved by empty promises or flattery.

not to put too fine a point on it

To speak bluntly: not to put too fine a point on it, your Emily is a liar
[figuratively, with reference to the sharpening of a weapon, tool, etc.]
More example sentences
  • For short stories are wonderful in this respect: they are, as the name of the genre strongly suggests, short, unlike novels, which, in comparison with most typical short stories, are, not to put too fine a point on it, long.
  • We are dealing here with people who are, not to put too fine a point on it, nuts.
  • This is, not to put too fine a point on it, insane.

one fine day

At some unspecified or unknown time: you want to be the Chancellor one fine day
More example sentences
  • And once we get down to improving our infrastructure, which includes good roads, uninterrupted power supply, a good international airport, which is going to happen one fine day, then we can say we are nearly there.
  • Normal service resumes… oh, I don't know… one fine day.
  • Then one fine day, a boy called Rocky almost proved me wrong.

Derivatives

finely

adverb
More example sentences
  • This is an exhausting, but finely and intelligently acted picture about the last months of a dying man.
  • The sets are simply enormous and finely detailed and are captured in all their glory.
  • Add two small green chillies, finely sliced, and cook for another couple of minutes.

fineness

noun
More example sentences
  • The fineness of the mesh makes them completely watertight.
  • He received the wool in huge bales and then graded it according to length and fineness, before despatching it to the cloth-maker or dealer.
  • Rock salt is what the salt mined from underground is called, whether it is literally mined in solid form (a practice now rare) or pumped up to the surface and then evaporated, to be crystallized to the desired degree of fineness.

Definition of fine in:

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Word of the day brannigan
Pronunciation: ˈbranɪg(ə)n
noun
a brawl or violent argument

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine2

Syllabification: fine
Pronunciation: /fīn
 
/

noun

A sum of money exacted as a penalty by a court of law or other authority: a parking fine
More example sentences
  • The question becomes, ‘Are they penalties or fines imposed by a court’?
  • The Supreme Court held these fines could, consistent with the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, be imposed only if preceded by a criminal trial.
  • The Court should have regard to any other fines or penalties suffered by the defendant for the misconduct in question.
Synonyms
(financial) penalty, sanction, fee, charge

verb

[with object] (often be fined) Back to top  
Punish (someone) by making them pay a sum of money, typically as a penalty for breaking the law: he was fined $600 and sentenced to one day in jail
More example sentences
  • The recent move to fine inconsiderate drivers from illegal parking is late in forthcoming.
  • The magistrate convicted the applicant and fined him $400 with costs.
  • In related news, the Taiwan High Court yesterday fined a man for illegally hiring a Chinese woman to work in his home.
Synonyms
penalize, impose a fine on, charge

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fin 'end, payment', from Latin finis 'end' (in medieval Latin denoting a sum paid on settling a lawsuit). The original sense was 'conclusion' (surviving in the phrase in fine); also used in the medieval Latin sense, the word came to denote a penalty of any kind, later specifically a monetary penalty.

Derivatives

fineable

Pronunciation: /ˈfīnəbəl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Substantial areas in Scotland are now covered by these Orders which make it a fineable offence to fish without a written permit and/or by a method not prescribed on the permit.
  • Not only is it a fineable offence, it's completely disrespectful.
  • They declined to divulge any other examples of fineable offences.

Definition of fine in:

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine3

Syllabification: fine
Pronunciation: /fēn
 
/

noun

1French brandy of high quality made from distilled wine rather than from pomace.
1.1 short for fine champagne.

Definition of fine in:

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine4

Syllabification: fi·ne
Pronunciation: /ˈfēnā/

noun

(In musical directions) the place where a piece of music finishes (when this is not at the end of the score but at the end of an earlier section that is repeated at the end of the piece).

Origin

Italian, from Latin finis 'end'.

Definition of fine in: