There are 2 definitions of flamboyant in English:

flamboyant1

Syllabification: flam·boy·ant
Pronunciation: /ˌflamˈboi(y)ənt
 
/

adjective

1(Of a person or their behavior) tending to attract attention because of their exuberance, confidence, and stylishness: a flamboyant display of aerobatics she is outgoing and flamboyant, continuously talking and joking
More example sentences
  • So tearing my eyes away, I paid attention to what my flamboyant friend was saying.
  • Fitting his flamboyant personality, he led the way with his own choice of costume, a rainbow-coloured cope and mitre, which he had designed and made for the occasion.
  • Whilst the guitarist needs to suffer for his art more and lose the baseball cap, you only notice this because their singer is a flamboyant individual.
Synonyms
exuberant, confident, lively, animated, vibrant, vivacious
1.1(Especially of clothing) noticeable because brightly colored, highly patterned, or unusual in style.
More example sentences
  • These vibrant colours and flamboyant designs distinguished Art Deco from previous artistic styles, along with its respect for Japanese heritage and its contribution to modernism.
  • The atmosphere was electric as they took to the stage in bright glittering and flamboyant costumes.
  • Drag is so colourful, so flamboyant, so sellable - that the complicating factors of class, race, and politics seem like, well, a drag.
Synonyms
colorful, brightly colored, bright, vibrant, vivid; dazzling, eye-catching, bold; showy, ostentatious, gaudy, garish, lurid, loud
informal jazzy, flashy
2 Architecture Of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flamelike tracery and ornate decoration.
More example sentences
  • To house his accumulation of art and curiosities he bought the hôtel of the abbots of Cluny that had been built in the flamboyant Gothic style around 1500.
  • There are many more examples of this type of flamboyant ironwork tracery sufficient to indicate that the style was rooted in the Low Countries.
  • They rebuilt the old basilica into a grand, very flamboyant Gothic edifice.
Synonyms
elaborate, ornate, fancy; baroque, rococo

Origin

mid 19th century: from French, literally 'flaming, blazing', present participle of flamboyer, from flambe 'a flame'.

Derivatives

flamboyance

noun
More example sentences
  • Brian, however, seemed less affected by the man's emotionally extravagant flamboyance.
  • Though bereft of flamboyance, it was exhilarating.
  • If he's smart, he's taking that feeling and channelling it back into the character of the son who can never live up to his mother's flamboyance.

flamboyancy

Pronunciation: /-ˈboiənsē/
noun
More example sentences
  • He admits, ‘My style has two extremes - I like simplicity and flamboyancy.’
  • As well as being one of Ireland's biggest property developers, he is also one of the more colourful, with a flamboyancy which borders on eccentricity.
  • The video shop's sign uses a typeface that looks like handwriting - it is all fancy, like a big person has written it in a spurt of flamboyancy.

flamboyantly

adverb
More example sentences
  • He had scruffy dark hair and was dressed flamboyantly, his bright clothes meticulously selected for their colour coordination, if not for their aesthetic appeal.
  • Everyone knows that there are two types of people in the world: those who grew up wanting to be flamboyantly famous rock stars, and those who wanted to be lawyers or doctors.
  • When the credits rolled, we walked out to the lobby and ran into yet another flamboyantly gay couple - hey, it was Steve and Sean!

Definition of flamboyant in:

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Pronunciation: kiːk
verb
peep surreptitiously

There are 2 definitions of flamboyant in English:

flamboyant2

Syllabification: flam·boy·ant
Pronunciation: /flamˈboiənt
 
/

noun

Another term for royal poinciana. (see poinciana).
More example sentences
  • They're over now and it seems to be the turn of exotics; bauhinias are out and flamboyants will be flaming across gardens and lighting up streets soon.
  • Hard landscaped except for an array of flamboyants (a local tropical tree with luxurious orange blossom), the courtyard marks the gradual transition between public and private realms.
  • There are several flamboyants to be found around the city.

Origin

late 19th century: probably a noun use of the French adjective flamboyant 'blazing' (see flamboyant1).

Definition of flamboyant in: