Definition of fluency in English:

fluency

Syllabification: flu·en·cy
Pronunciation: /ˈflo͞oənsē
 
/

noun

  • 1The quality or condition of being fluent, in particular.
    More example sentences
    • But fluency and cohesion are qualities that take time to develop and a clutch of new recruits, drafted in almost at one go, are unlikely to hit it off straight away.
    • Thus far this has been every bit as entertaining as I'd feared - no quality, no fluency.
    • Somewhere in between, Pankaj had one opportunity but by then his natural fluency and rhythm had been shattered and his contribution terminated at 15.
  • 1.1The ability to speak or write a foreign language easily and accurately: fluency in Spanish is essential
    More example sentences
    • Often each also has his own style of handwriting, announced gender, cultural and racial background, artistic talents, foreign language fluency, and IQ.
    • Their definitions are compatible with the Steiner curriculum: the teaching of emotional intelligence; lateral, creative thinking, and fluency in foreign languages.
    • This point is important because we cannot assume that a single psychologically constructed test will accurately describe language fluency.
  • 1.2The ability to express oneself easily and articulately.
    More example sentences
    • Even the US Supreme Court, unrenowned for its fluency in articulating harms, has recognized that fact.
    • He possessed an artist's intuition and a fluency with articulate meanings.
    • But then in his post-victory remarks, the candidate went on and on and on, boringly, without the lift and eloquence and fluency of even his opponent.
  • 1.3Gracefulness and ease of movement or style: the horse was jumping with breathtaking fluency
    More example sentences
    • The class I took at Equinox in Pasadena, California, reawakened my appreciation of the fluency of movement that sets ballet dancers apart from other athletes.
    • His playing has a wonderful fluency and easy style; the phrasing seems utterly instinctive, and there's not a moment when he seems to be making expressive effects for their own sake.
    • Michael Barber manages to include such information without ever causing congestion in the fluency of his style.

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin fluentia, from fluere 'to flow'.

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