Definition of fortuitous in English:

fortuitous

Syllabification: for·tu·i·tous
Pronunciation: /fôrˈto͞oətəs
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

fortuitously

adverb
More example sentences
  • There is a new chance for planners, councillors and the developer to adjust the approved layout and fortuitously correct the glaring mistakes before it is too late.
  • Rarely can two such major exhibitions have coincided so fortuitously to reveal so much about the roots of modern art.
  • It is, as Jane protests, no ‘miracle’, but an accident produced by their fortuitously mesmerizing themselves at the same critical moment.

fortuitousness

noun
More example sentences
  • Oh - and the apple slice is not lacking in fortuitousness - it exceeded my expectations.
  • Once that point is recognized, quantum mechanics emerges from the principle of genuine fortuitousness combined with the embodiment of spacetime symmetry, without any reference to degrees of freedom of particles or fields.
  • In starting from the surface, whether it be actual or reflected, Sawyer views such things as choice, understanding, consciousness through a prism of fortuitousness.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin fortuitus, from forte 'by chance', from fors 'chance, luck'.

Usage

The traditional, etymological meaning of fortuitous is ‘happening by chance’: a fortuitous meeting is a chance meeting, which might turn out to be either a good thing or a bad thing. In modern uses, however, fortuitous tends more often to be used to refer to fortunate outcomes, and the word has become more or less a synonym for ‘lucky’ or ‘fortunate.’ This use is frowned upon as being not etymologically correct and is best avoided except in informal contexts.

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Pronunciation: grəʊˈtɛskəri
noun
grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively