There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog1

Syllabification: frog
Pronunciation: /frôɡ
 
, fräɡ
 
/

noun

1A tailless amphibian with a short squat body, moist smooth skin, and very long hind legs for leaping.
  • Frogs are found in most families of the order Anura, but the ‘true frogs’ are confined to the large family Ranidae
More example sentences
  • Around 5,000 amphibian species, including frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders are thought to exist today.
  • Some amphibians we know today include frogs, toads, newts and salamanders.
  • A similar story can be told for several other species of toads, frogs, salamanders, alligators, and turtles around the world.
1.1 informal A person regarded as repulsive in character or appearance.
2 (Frog) informal offensive A French person.
More example sentences
  • Can the Boks lift themselves to beat the French or will the Frogs with their typical flair pull a fast one on us?
  • Let him give the people of Britain a crack at the enemy for whom our visceral antipathy has never abated - the snail-guzzling, effete, gesticulating, garlic-exhaling Frogs.
  • The British media are now too busy bashing the Frogs.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Hunt for or catch frogs.

Origin

Old English frogga, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vors and German Frosch. Used as a general term of abuse in Middle English, the term was applied specifically to the Dutch in the 17th century; its application to the French (late 18th century) is partly alliterative, partly from the reputation of the French for eating frogs' legs.

Phrases

have a frog in one's throat

informal Lose one’s voice or find it hard to speak because of hoarseness.
More example sentences
  • It sounded as though she had a frog in her throat.
  • I have always had a frog in my throat but now I have a feeling like something is stuck in my throat.
  • When I left Freetown on the helicopter on the first leg of my trip home I had a frog in my throat.

Derivatives

frogger

noun
More example sentences
  • O'Brian took a barb in the back as she dove at a group of unsuspecting froggers while trying to scatter them out of harm's way.
  • I did meet some compulsive froggers, quite a few of them in fact, while I was working on the project.

froggy

adjective
More example sentences
  • There are lights floating in the river that glow blue at night, and speakers all around make odd bell-like tones and froggy noises.
  • Then he turned to face one of his froggy minions, and nodded at him.
  • The dog looks around placidly, its froggy eyes bulging, its skin hanging around its compact body.

Definition of frog in:

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Word of the day anastrophe
Pronunciation: əˈnastrəfi
noun
the inversion of the usual order of words...

There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog2

Syllabification: frog
Pronunciation: /frôɡ
 
/

noun

1A thing used to hold or fasten something, in particular.
More example sentences
  • Sure, there are materials sold for that purpose, such as water-absorbing foam and metal pin holders, or frogs.
  • Some shovels have a plate welded over the frog to increase strength and keep the wooden handle drier and less prone to decay.
1.1An ornamental coat fastener or braid consisting of a spindle-shaped button and a loop through which it passes.
More example sentences
  • I wasn't exotic and I never thought about wearing a little black linen pants and a shirt that closed with frogs instead of buttons.
  • The costume was a very nice military top, green material with a frog or braid across the front, black wool tights with a red decoration on the side, and nice character shoes.
  • I know the braided loop on a traditional Asian costume is a frog.
1.2An attachment to a belt for holding a sword, bayonet, or similar weapon.
1.3A perforated or spiked device for holding the stems of flowers in an arrangement.
More example sentences
  • Fill the cups with well-soaked floral foam or use a small metal florist's frog, if necessary, to hold the flowers in place.
1.4The piece into which the hair is fitted at the lower end of the bow of a stringed instrument.
More example sentences
  • In Renaissance Europe the stick became straighter, and a wooden frog was wedged between stick and hair to hold them apart at the heel.
  • Franchomme had a Stradivari cello but held the bow above the frog, making for flexibility and subtlety of tone rather than robustness.
1.5A grooved metal plate for guiding the wheels of a railroad vehicle at an intersection.
More example sentences
  • If you stand close by the crossing, you can feel the ground shake as the wheels bang over the frogs.

Origin

early 18th century: perhaps a use of frog1, influenced by synonymous Italian forchetta or French fourchette 'small fork', because of the shape.

Definition of frog in:

There are 3 definitions of frog in English:

frog3

Syllabification: frog
Pronunciation: /frôɡ
 
/

noun

1An elastic horny pad growing in the sole of a horse’s hoof, helping to absorb the shock when the hoof hits the ground.
More example sentences
  • ‘The horse scraped the frog of his left hoof in the backstretch and lost his drive,’ Nakatani said.
  • The ground surface of the foot, that is the sole, bars and frog, are not touched.
  • ‘She has flat feet and her frogs have gotten beat up in the past, but her feet have been good lately,’ Hills said.
1.1A raised or swollen area on a surface.

Origin

early 17th century: perhaps from frog2.

Definition of frog in: