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gab

Syllabification: gab
Pronunciation: /ɡab
 
/
informal

Definition of gab in English:

verb (gabs, gabbing, gabbed)

[no object]
Talk, typically at length, about trivial matters: Franny walked right past a woman gabbing on the phone
More example sentences
  • If your son has to swerve to avoid a little kid or a guy gabbing on the phone and driving an SUV, he might not be able to do it, especially at low speed, where steering effort is increased.
  • They go their separate ways whenever possible: He's planted in front of the television; she's gabbing on the phone to friends.
  • Aren't you guys into other stuff, like gabbing on the phone, Rollerblading or going to the movies?

noun

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Talk; chatter.
Example sentences
  • As the clock-hands sweep into the witching hour, on October 30, a new season of gab and glitter will open at the Varscona Theatre.
  • Montgomery's been in some superb bands and put out some solid solo records in the US, and I once had a nice long backyard gab with him about music over a keg.
  • The talk and news shows are equally diverse, with channels devoted to both liberal and conservative gab, the audio from cable TV news networks and a National Public Radio feed.

Origin

early 18th century: variant of gob1.

More
  • gobsmacked from [1980s]:

    The word gobsmacked presumably refers either to the shock of being hit in the mouth or to the action of clapping your hand to your mouth in astonishment. Gob, an informal word for ‘mouth’ (mid 16th century), may come from Scottish Gaelic gob ‘beak or mouth’. Gab, as in the gift of the gab and the adjective gabby, both early 18th century, are variants of gob. There is another gob (Late Middle English), ‘a lump of something’, that came into English from Old French gobe ‘mouthful or lump’ which may also be Celtic: gobble (early 17th century) is probably based on this gob.

Words that rhyme with gab

blab, cab, confab, crab, Crabbe, dab, drab, fab, flab, grab, jab, kebab, lab, nab, scab, slab, smash-and-grab, stab, tab

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