There are 4 definitions of gaff in English:

gaff1

Syllabification: gaff

noun

  • 1A stick with a hook, or a barbed spear, for landing large fish.
    More example sentences
    • Before commercialization, when lobsters were fished as a subsistence item, or for sale or barter in small local markets, they were typically fished by hand or with gaffs and spears.
    • The five-part sculpture tells a story from the folk history of Kiltimagh and illustrates the drama of the catching of salmon by the illegal gaff and spear on winter nights in the early 1900s.
    • This fish we fight for about 15 minutes, but we are using a small diameter wind-on and cannot get the fish within range of the gaff even though we have most of the leader on the reel.
  • 2 Sailing A spar to which the head of a fore-and-aft sail is bent.
    More example sentences
    • Vessels built of ferrocement may be accepted if they have a gaff or traditional schooner rig.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • Seize or impale with a gaff.
    More example sentences
    • Therefore, I favour such deceptive tactics as dragging a small, weighted hook wrapped in colourful wool across the sandy bottom and gaffing the unsuspecting honeymooners mid-coitus.
    • With a combination of moving back up the beach and leaning over almost 180 degrees backwards to put pressure on the rod, we managed to get it into the surf, whereupon our excellent guide leaped in and gaffed it.
    • Adams fought the fish for over half an hour before he finally reeled in and gaffed the exhausted bass.

Origin

Middle English: from Provençal gaf 'hook'; related to gaffe.

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Word of the day mage
Pronunciation: meɪdʒ
noun
a magician or learned person

There are 4 definitions of gaff in English:

gaff2

Syllabification: gaff

noun

informal
  • Rough treatment; criticism: if wages increase, perhaps we can stand the gaff
    More example sentences
    • But there was a lanky business major and a tough dude who competed in rodeos on weekends as well, and didn't take gaff from anyone, including the GDA.

Origin

early 19th century (in the senses 'outcry; nonsense' and in the phrase blow the gaff 'let out a secret'): of unknown origin.

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There are 4 definitions of gaff in English:

gaff3

Line breaks: gaff

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

(in phrase blow the gaff) British informal
  • Reveal a plot or secret: he was about to blow the gaff on the conspiracy

Origin

early 19th century: of unknown origin.

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There are 4 definitions of gaff in English:

gaff4

Syllabification: gaff

noun

British informal
  • A house, apartment, or other building, especially as being a person’s home: John’s new gaff is on McDonald Road
    More example sentences
    • It is a luxurious gaff with seven reception rooms and Prince Michael is getting away with one of the best housing benefit scams in the land.
    • One's a millionaire, one has done really well and lives in Ireland, one of them has a big gaff in the New Town.
    • I may have liked God when I was three, as I testified on the study wall, but He certainly wouldn't be very fond of me when He found out what I'd done to His gaff in Acton.

Origin

1930s: of unknown origin.

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