Definition of gargle in English:

gargle

Syllabification: gar·gle
Pronunciation: /ˈgärgəl
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • Wash one’s mouth and throat with a liquid kept in motion by exhaling through it: instruct patients to gargle with warm water
    More example sentences
    • After lunch I felt so bad I dissolved some aspirin in warm water, gargled noisily and swallowed gratefully.
    • Hot showers, a humidifier, and gargling with warm saltwater aid drainage, shrink inflamed membranes and soothe sore-throat pain.
    • Traditionally patients are advised to gargle with saline, often with the addition of sodium bicarbonate.

noun

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  • 1An act or instance or the sound of gargling: a swig and gargle of mouthwash
    More example sentences
    • The muted, standard exhaust is now more of a burbling gargle with undertones of thunder.
    • The usual song is a cacophony of gargles, chitters and squawks.
    • Myrrh resins and tinctures have also been used as a gargle and mouthwash, made by steeping one teaspoon of myrrh in one pint of boiling water for a few minutes, to treat gum infections, coughs and other chest problems.
  • 1.1 [usually in singular] A liquid used for gargling.
    More example sentences
    • The infusion of the leaves is a gargle for sore throat.
    • Take honey on its own or make a gargle by mixing two tablespoons of set honey with four tablespoons of cider vinegar and a pinch of salt.
    • Still, it's better than the salt-water gargle many people recommend for sore throats.

Origin

early 16th century: from French gargouiller 'gurgle, bubble', from gargouille 'throat' (see gargoyle).

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