There are 2 definitions of gauntlet in English:

gauntlet1

Syllabification: gaunt·let
Pronunciation: /ˈgôntlit, ˈgänt-
 
/

noun

  • 1A stout glove with a long loose wrist.
    More example sentences
    • He wore a skin tight black muscle shirt, thick black jean pants, and gauntlets with open fingers.
    • She had goldsmiths make a matching bracelet, which was always worn on her right wrist, over fingerless black gauntlets.
    • Her hair was hidden beneath a bandanna and she wore a cloth vest, jean shorts and black, fingerless gauntlets.
  • 1.1 historical An armored glove, as worn by a medieval knight.
    More example sentences
    • He dropped his swords and pummelled the paladin's helm with his armoured gauntlets, knocking him backwards and disorientating him for a second.
    • Some knights were cited as wearing mail gloves under their plated gauntlets for added strength.
    • In other words, the most successful stabilization force is one that wears both the mailed gauntlet and the velvet glove.
  • 1.2The part of a glove covering the wrist.
    More example sentences
    • The gauntlet on the glove was to cover up the aluminum, so it wouldn't heat up in the light.
    • She flexed her wrists, feeling the leather gauntlets stretch and slide along her forearms.
    • They're made of goatskin, with extra-long gauntlets for up-to-the-elbow protection.

Phrases

take up (or throw down) the gauntlet

Accept (or issue) a challenge.
[from the medieval custom of issuing a challenge by throwing one's gauntlet to the ground; whoever picked it up was deemed to have accepted the challenge]
More example sentences
  • We should throw down the gauntlet and challenge this absurd perception.
  • The game also lets you take up the gauntlet of 14 challenges such as trying to win promotion, or avoiding relegation in six weeks, so not to tie you down to a long season if you don't have time.
  • He then throws down the gauntlet by challenging educational reformers to come up with suitable new methods of teaching morality.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French gantelet, diminutive of gant 'glove', of Germanic origin.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 2 definitions of gauntlet in English:

gauntlet2

Syllabification: gaunt·let
Pronunciation: /
 
ˈgôntlit/
(also gantlet /ˈgantlit, ˈgônt-/)

noun

(in phrase run the gauntlet)
  • 1Go through an intimidating or dangerous crowd, place, or experience in order to reach a goal: they had to run the gauntlet of television cameras
    More example sentences
    • This, it emerges, is reached by running the gauntlet alongside the entrance for the police vans and what look like the service entries for the dustbins and the meter readers.
    • Today, again, she had to run the gauntlet of camera crews, and the fact that her lawyers have attempted to raise more interest in local media about this case has brought more local cameras here.
    • Unofficial paths and access ways are now closed off to walkers, cyclists and horse riders, forcing them to run the gauntlet of the traffic on the roads to reach the dwindling recreation areas.
  • 2 historical Undergo the military punishment of receiving blows while running between two rows of men with sticks.

Origin

mid 17th century: alteration of gantlope (from Swedish gatlopp, from gata 'lane' + lopp 'course') by association with gauntlet1.

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