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gazette

Syllabification: ga·zette
Pronunciation: /ɡəˈzet
 
/

Definition of gazette in English:

noun

1(Used in the names of periodicals) a journal or newspaper.
2British The official publication of a government organization or institution, listing appointments and other public notices.
Example sentences
  • It was submitted that examination of this translation of the official gazette supplemented the views which he advanced.
  • The closure becomes effective only after the public has been notified about its legality through the government gazette or through local newspaper adverts.
  • When the commission receives the application, it places a notice in the government gazette and in a newspaper circulated in the respective area.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] British Back to top  
Announce or publish in an official gazette.
Example sentences
  • He also announced that he gazetted a set of norms and standards last week for educators, which he described as a ‘developmental’ rather than a policing exercise.
  • He earned the respect and friendship of one of the assisting naval officers, a certain Horatio Nelson (who later testified at his trial), and his name was gazetted in the official published reports.
  • ‘The minister agreed not to gazette the restructuring bill until the talks with unions are over,’ he said.

Origin

early 17th century: via French from Italian gazzetta, originally Venetian gazeta de la novità 'a halfpennyworth of news' (because the news-sheet sold for a gazeta, a Venetian coin of small value).

More
  • The word gazette came via French from Italian gazzetta, a shortening of the Venetian dialect gazeta de la novità ‘a halfpennyworth of news’—the news-sheet sold for a gazeta, a Venetian coin of very little value. The verb phrase to be gazetted (late 17th century) meant ‘be the subject of an announcement in a gazette’, and ‘be named in a gazette as being appointed to a military command’. Gazetteer is also early 17th century when it meant ‘journalist’: The current use of the word for a geographical index comes from a late 17th-century gazetteer called The Gazetteer's: or, Newsman's Interpreter: Being a Geographical Index.

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