Definition of gentry in English:

gentry

Syllabification: gen·try
Pronunciation: /ˈjentrē
 
/

noun

(often the gentry)
1People of good social position, specifically (in the UK) the class of people next below the nobility in position and birth: a member of the landed gentry
More example sentences
  • The survival of the old elites extended to the gentry and petty nobility.
  • The dissolution of the monasteries strengthened the influence of the gentry and nobility and the shire became famous for its landed estates.
  • The source of ruling-class opposition was a distinct sector of the class, the landed gentry, and was perfectly rational in basis.
Synonyms
upper classes, privileged classes, elite, high society, haut monde, smart set; establishment, aristocracy
informal upper crust, top drawer
1.1 [with adjective] People of a specified class or group: a New Orleans family of Creole gentry
More example sentences
  • Although well disassociated from the taint of trade, my family was country gentry.
  • Born to a poor family of Burgundian gentry, he served as a cadet under Condé during the Fronde and was promptly captured.
  • The car looks cool, and the Cross Country model appeals to the exurban gentry, but that's about it.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'superiority of birth or rank'): from Anglo-Norman French genterie, based on gentil (see gentle1).

Definition of gentry in:

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