Definition of glee in English:

glee

Syllabification: glee
Pronunciation: /glē
 
/

noun

1Great delight: his face lit up with impish glee
More example sentences
  • Too often their misfortunes are met with glee, a schadenfreude that is quite horrifying.
  • Of course e-cards and virtual flowers are also welcome with great amounts of joy and glee.
  • Between each new variation comes another burst of jubilant glee.
Synonyms
2A song for men’s voices in three or more parts, usually unaccompanied, of a type popular especially circa 1750–1830.
More example sentences
  • Later, boys were paid to sing treble parts at meetings of glee clubs, and glees for SATB became more common.
  • Instrumental tutors were published and glees (simple part-songs for male voices) became popular.
  • Women were still restricted to the parlor, where they played keyboard instruments and the ‘English guitar’ and sang solos and a range of polite glees for upper and mixed voices.

Origin

Old English glēo 'entertainment, music, fun', of Germanic origin. sense 2 dates from the mid 17th century.

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