Definition of gurgle in English:

gurgle

Syllabification: gur·gle
Pronunciation: /ˈɡərɡəl
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Make a hollow bubbling sound like that made by water running out of a bottle: my stomach gurgled (as adjective gurgling) a faint gurgling noise
More example sentences
  • Gabrielle splashed happily, gurgling as the warm water trickled down her front.
  • Katie heard the distinct sounds of water gurgling and wind whistling though caves in the rock.
  • Several bottles of fine Chardonnay gurgled in Ted's pack.
Synonyms
babble, burble, tinkle, bubble, ripple, murmur, purl, splash
literary plash
1.1 [with adverbial of direction] (Of a liquid) run or flow with a bubbling sound: chemicals gurgle down a drain straight into the sewers
More example sentences
  • Yet below the mesquite bosk that edges the bed of Cienagua Creek, water gurgles up and flows intermittently from a mostly underground stream.
  • Water gurgled down in streams from the tin roof.
  • From the floor of the second pitch, the water gurgles down a tight rift, but our route is along a traverse following a washed-out shale band.

noun

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A gurgling sound: Catherine gave a gurgle of laughter
More example sentences
  • I couldn't stop the gurgle of laughter erupting.
  • He felt a small gurgle of laughter in the back of his throat, at let it come, slipping into a smirk and then morphing into a grin.
  • The beat is the traditional 4/4 house beat, with plenty of skittering gurgles and found sounds mixed in.
Synonyms
babbling, tinkling, bubbling, rippling, trickling, murmur, murmuring, purling, splashing
literary plashing

Origin

late Middle English: imitative, or directly from Dutch gorgelen, German gurgeln, or medieval Latin gurgulare, all from Latin gurgulio 'gullet'.

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