Definition of habitation in English:

habitation

Syllabification: hab·i·ta·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌhabəˈtāSH(ə)n
 
/

noun

1The state or process of living in a particular place: signs of human habitation
More example sentences
  • But due to fragmentation and increased human habitation, the big cat's habitat has shrunk further.
  • We could only wonder, for there is a lot of landscape out there and not too many signs of human habitation.
  • Four hours had passed, and barren mountain after barren mountain still lay ahead, the only sign of human habitation being a couple of tiny isolated dwellings.
Synonyms
1.1 formal A place in which to live; a house or home.
More example sentences
  • A decade or so before there used to be fewer fishermen houses but now the habitations have become much more sprawling.
  • Fashioned after Indian lodges, the habitations were made out of thick, tanned skins stretched over a pole structure ten feet or so in diameter.
  • It is divided into departments that are subdivided into arrondissements, communes, commune sectionals, and habitations.
Synonyms
residence, place of residence, house, home, seat, lodging place, billet, quarters, living quarters, rooms, accommodations
informal pad, digs

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from Latin habitatio(n-), from habitare 'inhabit'.

Derivatives

habitative

Pronunciation: /ˈhabitəˌtiv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Compound names are composed of an adjectival element and a habitative or topographic element.
  • However, examples of habitative elements occurring in the first position are not unknown.
  • Although a rarity in the west of the country, it is the commonest habitative element of the earliest recorded English place-names.

Definition of habitation in:

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adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected