There are 2 definitions of hag in English:

hag1

Syllabification: hag

noun

1A witch, especially one in the form of an ugly old woman (often used as a term of disparagement for a woman): a fat old hag in a dirty apron
More example sentences
  • I must admit, I was expecting an ugly old hag with a diseased or pale face… so what I saw startled me.
  • An old hag of a witch was approaching, her walk was staggered and she had enough warts on her nose so that you didn't know there was even a nose there.
  • Accompanying them was an old hag with a witches hat and long stringy green, white and gold hair.
Synonyms
crone, old woman, gorgon
informal witch, crow, cow, old bag
2 short for hagfish.
More example sentences
  • As a first step toward an understanding of the molecular basis for the divergence of pigment patterns and speciation in cichlids, we cloned and characterized a cichlid homolog of the zebrafish hag gene.

Origin

Middle English: perhaps from Old English hægtesse, hegtes, related to Dutch heks and German Hexe 'witch', of unknown ultimate origin.

Derivatives

haggish

adjective
More example sentences
  • Yeah, Debbie, Marla was a real blonde - unlike your haggish self.
  • Their father's mother worked a factory job leaving the two sisters with their haggish great-grandmother.
  • The haggish woman stepped forward, ‘we must move quickly.’

Definition of hag in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of hag in English:

hag2

Syllabification: hag

noun

Scottish & Northern English
1 (also peat hag) An overhang of peat.
More example sentences
  • But so were the boulders and lumps of peat hag which pocked the scene.
  • This broad mass of peat hags and bog pools rises to over 680-metres at the head of Littondale.
2A soft place on a moor or a firm place in a bog.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a gap in a cliff): from Old Norse hǫgg 'gap', from hǫggva 'hack, hew'.

Definition of hag in: