Definition of haiku in English:

haiku

Syllabification: hai·ku
Pronunciation: /ˈhīˌko͞o, ˌhīˈko͞o
 
/

noun (plural same or haikus)

1A Japanese poem of seventeen syllables, in three lines of five, seven, and five, traditionally evoking images of the natural world.
More example sentences
  • It tastes of deepening autumn and makes me long for one or two haiku [seventeen-syllable Japanese poems to capture the feeling.
  • He likened text message poetry to haikus, the ancient Japanese art of writing three-line poems.
  • This haiku (a 17 syllable epigrammatic verse) by one of Japan's greatest poets seems at first glance to have little to it.
1.1An English imitation of this.
More example sentences
  • One early exercise that I'm still inordinately proud of was the instruction to ‘write a haiku using only the words you can find on the racing page of the morning paper.’
  • They could add descriptive words, phrases or sentences, or they could write a poem, haiku, alliteration, metaphor, or perhaps words from a song.
  • I love reading books, taking long walks in the park, and writing haikus. (this actually is a haiku)

Origin

Japanese, contracted form of haikai no ku 'light verse'.

Definition of haiku in:

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Word of the day dinkum
Pronunciation: ˈdɪŋkəm
adjective
(of an article or person) genuine, honest, true