There are 3 main definitions of hash in English:

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hash1

Syllabification: hash
Pronunciation: /haSH
 
/

noun

1A dish of cooked meat cut into small pieces and cooked again, usually with potatoes.
Example sentences
  • Make a hash by frying up all the leftover roast potatoes and parsnips, adding some chopped turkey and perhaps a little leftover stuffing too.
  • Haley puts some American fries, corned beef hash, and scrambled eggs on her plate.
  • Down at the Hope & Anchor restaurant in Red Hook, Brooklyn, Dianna Munz serves a barbecued-ham-and-scallion hash with two fried eggs.
1.1North American A finely chopped mixture: a hash of raw tomatoes, chili peppers, and cilantro
More example sentences
  • Its Pinot Noir reduction, sesame-shot spinach and hashed potato accompaniments seemed altogether fitting.
1.2A mixture of jumbled incongruous things; a mess.
Example sentences
  • I say to members opposite that they are responsible for $100 million of wasted public money, because of their poor policy, poor lawmaking, and the continuous hashes that we have seen in this very important area of law.
  • Caution threatened to descend into catatonia as, after a bright opening minute or so, the first half turned into a hash of misplaced passes, hoofs into the air and slithering ineptitude.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Make (meat or other food) into a hash.
Example sentences
  • In Gower they are added to hashed meat, made into pies with apples, and put into soup.
  • It contains hashed meat, generally pork, seasoned with aromatic herbs or spices (pepper, red pepper, garlic, rosemary, thyme, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, etc.
1.1North American Chop (meat or vegetables).
Example sentences
  • Hash the meat and make it into a stuffing with raisins, stoned ripe olives and hard-boiled eggs minced fine.
  • Before dinner you may have to hash out who is going to hash the meat and potatoes.
2 (hash something out) Come to agreement on something after lengthy and vigorous discussion: they went to the diner to hash out ideas
More example sentences
  • Maybe you two should be hashing your problems out in counseling instead of drive-by ambushing an innocent bystander.
  • But as they hashed it out, and they brought up the inherent problems with establishing private accounts, he instead came around to their point of view.
  • We finally sat down a little while ago and hashed it out.

Origin

late 16th century (as a verb): from French hacher, from hache (see hatchet).

More
  • A hash is a dish of cooked meat cut into small pieces and then reheated in gravy. Its 16th-century origin is a French word meaning ‘an axe’, from which hatchet and the use of hatch meaning ‘to mark a surface with close parallel lines to represent shading’ also derive. The hash sign (the sign #) only dates from the 1980s and is probably also from this use of hatch. In the 18th century hash developed the sense of ‘a jumble of mismatched parts’, which forms the basis of the modern expression to make a hash of. See also hotchpotch

Phrases

make a hash of

1
informal Make a mess of; bungle: listening to other board members make a hash of things
More example sentences
  • Damien Hindle fired in a cross which Cherry made a hash of and his palmed clearance dropped to Doni Clarke, who headed home from six yards.
  • Let us take, for example, the so-called principles of the treaty, which were sent off to the judges to deal with and which, in my opinion, they have made a hash of.
  • Almost immediately the ball was dispatched downfield, but Reyna made a hash of his goal attempt and the ball sailed high over Nick Culkin's bar.
Synonyms

settle someone's hash

2
informal Deal with and subdue someone in no uncertain manner.
Example sentences
  • I could exercise my constitutional right to firearms ownership and just go up in a tower and start shooting until a police sniper settles my hash.
  • That would have settled his hash, and it made me feel better when I realized I could have said it.
  • The Professor strongly suspects defamation lawyers will settle Marr 's hash.

sling hash

3
see sling1.

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There are 3 main definitions of hash in English:

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hash2

Syllabification: hash
Pronunciation: /haSH
 
/

noun

informal
Short for hashish.
Example sentences
  • Cannibis, aka marijuana, hash, pot, weed, smoke, draw, call it what you will, is a drug.
  • You may have heard it called marijuana, weed or hash but it is still cannabis, a natural drug that comes from a plant.
  • Three percent of the sample indicated ever having used illicit drugs at this time; again, the most frequently cited category by far was marijuana, hash, or weed.

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There are 3 main definitions of hash in English:

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hash3

Syllabification: hash
Pronunciation: /haSH
 
/
(also hash sign)

noun

chiefly British
The sign Example sentences
  • Meanwhile, at least one of the companies being threatened, BigChampagne, claims that Altnet has no clue what they're talking about, since they don't use a hash to identify files.
  • The company claims they own a patent on using a hash to identify files.
  • Re-examining indexing methods based on these constraints yielded an interesting solution: B-trees and hashes are the two most commonly used indexing methods.

Origin

1980s: probably from hatch3, altered by folk etymology.

More
  • A hash is a dish of cooked meat cut into small pieces and then reheated in gravy. Its 16th-century origin is a French word meaning ‘an axe’, from which hatchet and the use of hatch meaning ‘to mark a surface with close parallel lines to represent shading’ also derive. The hash sign (the sign #) only dates from the 1980s and is probably also from this use of hatch. In the 18th century hash developed the sense of ‘a jumble of mismatched parts’, which forms the basis of the modern expression to make a hash of. See also hotchpotch

Usage

The symbol #, called hash in British English, has different names, some of them potentially confusing. In the US, it is referred to as either the number sign (when used in contexts such as question #2) or the pound sign (when used as a symbol for pounds of weight: 2# of sugar). The technical name for it is the octothorp.

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