There are 3 definitions of hatch in English:

hatch1

Syllabification: hatch
Pronunciation: /haCH
 
/

noun

  • 1An opening of restricted size allowing for passage from one area to another, in particular.
    More example sentences
    • There are three opening ports on each side of the cabin trunk, an opening hatch forward plus the companionway for excellent ventilation.
    • The easiest and safest passage to the foredeck is through the forward deck hatch.
    • There are two opening deck hatches and eight opening bronze ports for the best ventilation to be found on a boat this size.
  • 1.1A door in an aircraft, spacecraft, or submarine.
    More example sentences
    • And as the forward escape hatch was also destroyed, the LR5's only hope of gaining access to the submarine now is through the aft hatch.
    • The pilot and his passenger, who were both wearing lap and diagonal shoulder straps, escaped injury and were able to climb out of the aircraft through the normal hatches.
    • First Lt. Bill Bower, ready to bail out, paused at one of the bomber's hatches and peered into the darkening sky below for some sign that his crew got out of the aircraft safely.
  • 1.2An opening in the deck of a boat or ship leading to the cabin or a lower level, especially a hold: a cargo hatch
    More example sentences
    • He unscrewed the bolts that secured an access hatch to the wall and keyed something into a control panel adjacent to it.
    • There was also an access hatch in the floor that would require the use of a fork lift truck to lift goods of any weight up into the second floor.
    • Emily leads the others down a short corridor until they come to an access hatch in the wall.
  • 1.3 An opening in a ceiling leading to a loft.
    More example sentences
    • Mrs Murphy said her patio doors rattled and even her loft hatch in the ceiling moved.
    • Unbelievably for me I failed to put my foot through the ceiling, or fall through the loft hatch, or step on any water pipes, and every winter we are as snug as a bug in a rug.
    • I wear the free polythene gloves provided, and make sure that there is a straight and uncluttered escape route from where I am standing back to the loft hatch.
  • 1.4 An opening in a kitchen wall for serving or selling food through: a service hatch
    More example sentences
    • After a few minutes mum would poke her head through the serving hatch in the wall between the kitchen and dining room, stretching her sinewy neck like a curious chicken.
    • There are only three tables on the ground floor sharing an open hatch for the sale of soft ice cream.
    • Bowyer, who had been drinking, approached the serving hatch and asked for a burger.
  • 1.5The rear door of a hatchback car.
    More example sentences
    • It has the look of a nice large saloon, provides plenty of space for passengers, and a large boot reached through a rear hatch.
    • Now classified as a mid-size sedan, it's only slightly smaller than a Camry and even more versatile with its rear hatch.
    • Open up the rear hatch and you can fit in a week's shopping… for a family of 15!
  • 1.6 short for hatchback.
    More example sentences
    • Saloons attract marginally lower insurance costs, as it's perceived that gaining access to a hatch is easier.
    • This is a car that handles with an enjoyable agility, steers with sporting precision and musters enough urge from its titchy 659 cc engine to keep pace with all but the most spiritedly driven hot hatches.
    • One way of looking at it is: Plenty of kids buy and modify Honda Civics, especially the hatch versions.

Phrases

down the hatch

informal Used in a toast; drink up.
More example sentences
  • ‘Well,’ he thought ‘Down the hatch.’ Alex set the empty glass down on the bar and ordered another.
  • One for you, two for me. Down the hatch!
  • Drain that one, go on, down the hatch, there's plenty more.

Origin

Old English hæcc (denoting the lower half of a divided door), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hek 'paling, screen'.

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 3 definitions of hatch in English:

hatch2

Syllabification: hatch
Pronunciation: /
 
haCH/

verb

  • 1 [no object] (Of a young bird, fish, or reptile) emerge from its egg: ten little chicks hatched out
    More example sentences
    • In the first two weeks after the young hatch, the female stays on the nest to brood them, and the male brings food for the female and the owlets.
    • Roughly a hundred of these snakes could fit inside of the giant egg that the single snake hatched from.
    • Just because the tops of many eggs were broken, does not necessarily mean the dinosaurs hatched.
  • 1.1(Of an egg) open and produce a young animal: eggs need to be put in a warm place to hatch
    More example sentences
    • When the eggs hatch, the caterpillar enters the first instar (stage of development).
    • Once the eggs hatch, both the male and the female feed the young.
    • Once the eggs hatch, the Larvae burrow inside the host and begin consuming nonessential tissues.
  • 1.2 [with object] Incubate (an egg): the eggs are best hatched under broody hens or in incubators
    More example sentences
    • Hatcheries, which use incubators to hatch the eggs, take advantage of this biological phenomenon for shipping.
    • Mother hen hatches her eggs in a farmyard and finds one of her baby chicks is a scrawny, ugly duck.
    • The males are left behind to guard and hatch the eggs, which they cradle at all times on top of their feet, even during blinding blizzards.
    Synonyms
  • 1.3 [with object] Cause (a young animal) to emerge from its egg: our penguins were hatched and hand-reared here
    More example sentences
    • Lobster larvae were hatched in our culture facility and fed live brine shrimp.
    • After emerging, the moths were stored at 4°C. Moths are incapable of moving at low temperatures and thus they remained in good condition until all larvae were hatched.
    • Because of our aim to prevent competition within broods, we carried out the survival analyses for experimental chicks without the inclusion of the four nests that had hatched two chicks.
  • 2 [with object] Conspire to devise (a plot or plan): the little plot that you and Sylvia hatched up last night
    More example sentences
    • The pedestrianisation scheme has gone ahead even though it is difficult to find anyone outside the offices in which the plan has been hatched up who supports it.
    • Did the two hatch the plot together, in secrecy, with the over eager Heffernan ready to cop the worst of it should their plan go belly up?
    • So together they hatch the plot of doing The War of the Worlds on radio, to wow the studios.
    Synonyms

noun

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  • A newly hatched brood: a hatch of mayflies
    More example sentences
    • Every spring the moorhens build themselves a nest on a raft of twigs or on the bank at the waterline, for a clutch of speckled brown eggs to bring off a hatch of four or five tiny brown-black chicks.
    • Mayfly hatches are not confined to rivers, some lakes also have spectacular mayfly hatches.
    • Nests were revisited on the expected hatch day and every 3 days after hatching to assess nest success and nestling survival.

Origin

Middle English hacche; related to Swedish häcka and Danish hække.

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There are 3 definitions of hatch in English:

hatch3

Syllabification: hatch
Pronunciation: /
 
haCH/

verb

[with object]
  • (In fine art and technical drawing) shade (an area) with closely drawn parallel lines: (as noun hatching) the miniaturist’s use of hatching and stippling
    More example sentences
    • As I said, in the plan that is annexed to the first respondents' submissions, it is the shaded hatched area.
    • But my gratitude also extends to those drivers who reverse on to main roads, see hatched areas as special taxi lanes and who ask for the removal of the indicator lights upon purchase of their vehicle.
    • It cited improvements to the road layout, including lane markings, hatched areas and clearer road signs as the reason.

Origin

late 15th century (in the sense 'inlay with strips of metal'): from Old French hacher, from hache (see hatchet).

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