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helter-skelter

Syllabification: hel·ter-skel·ter
Pronunciation: /ˌheltərˈskeltər
 
/

Definition of helter-skelter in English:

adjective& adverb

In disorderly haste or confusion: [as adjective]: she had blamed her grogginess on a helter-skelter lifestyle [as adverb]: hurtling helter-skelter down the pavement
More example sentences
  • Tell them that you feel friendship is undervalued in this helter-skelter crazy materialistic world.
  • Approaching this year's jamboree in Gloucestershire, he is riding better than ever at 34, having put the brakes on a helter-skelter lifestyle.
  • The stunningly modern helter-skelter overpasses seem rather incongruous with a melange of bikes and cars that follow a system of road safety entirely their own.
Synonyms
headlong, pell-mell, hotfoot, posthaste, hastily, hurriedly, at full tilt, hell-bent for leather;

noun

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1 [in singular] Disorder; confusion: the helter-skelter of a school day
More example sentences
  • That's the way it's supposed to be - an evolving drama with nuance, color, deliberate pacing, and bursts of action that take you away from the helter-skelter of our otherwise rush-rush worlds.
  • But why dwell on such things when the sun has returned with renewed resolve, teasing blooms from the helter-skelter of bare branches?
  • Also, you have to bear in mind that a pullout cannot just be a chaotic one, a helter-skelter.
2British A tall spiral slide winding around a tower at a fair.
Example sentences
  • There's a vast market, with traders clad in frock coats, a fairground with hurdy-gurdies and helter-skelters, an artificial ice rink and three outdoor stages full of choirs and bands.
  • There are waltzers, dodgems, helter-skelters and one or two old fashioned merry-go-rounds with properly painted horses.
  • In a bid to create a rival attraction to the London Eye and the Manchester Wheel, Ulverston Town Council decides to convert the monument into a helter-skelter.

Origin

late 16th century (as an adverb): a rhyming jingle of unknown origin, perhaps symbolic of running feet or from Middle English skelte 'hasten'.

Definition of helter-skelter in:

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