There are 3 main definitions of hind in English:

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hind1

Syllabification: hind
Pronunciation: /hīnd
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
(Especially of a bodily part) situated at the back; posterior: he snagged a calf by the hind leg
More example sentences
  • This was associated with infection by a flatworm or fluke infection called Ribeiroia, which formed cysts near the hind legs.
  • The same held true when they injected the drug into multiple ganglia that connect to the tail and hind legs.
  • Herodotus rejoins that camels have four thighbones in their hind legs, and that their genitals face backwards.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: perhaps shortened from Old English behindan (see behind).

Phrases

on one's hind legs

1
see leg.

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There are 3 main definitions of hind in English:

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hind2

Syllabification: hind
Pronunciation: /hīnd
 
/

noun

1A female deer, especially a red deer or sika in and after its third year.
Example sentences
  • In red deer, dominant hinds produce a male-biased offspring sex ratio, but only at low population density.
  • In Europe, the red-deer hinds are often culled, but managers often do the shooting.
  • For example, dominant red deer hinds produce more surviving offspring over their lives than do subordinates.
2Any of several large edible groupers with spotted markings.
Example sentences
  • Small hard-skinned fish such as snappers, grouper, breams and hind should be gutted and scaled on capture and kept in slurry.

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hinde and German Hinde, from an Indo-European root meaning 'hornless', shared by Greek kemas 'young deer'.

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There are 3 main definitions of hind in English:

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hind3

Syllabification: hind
Pronunciation: /hīnd
 
/

noun

archaic , chiefly Scottish
1.1A peasant or rustic.

Origin

late Old English hīne 'household servants', apparently from hīgna, hīna, genitive plural of hīgan, hīwan 'family members'.

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