There are 3 definitions of hood in English:

hood1

Syllabification: hood
Pronunciation: /ho͝od
 
/

noun

1A covering for the head and neck with an opening for the face, typically forming part of a coat or sweatshirt.
More example sentences
  • They wore duffel coats with the hoods up.
  • Right in front of her was a group people in cloaks, their hoods pulled over their faces to hide themselves, no doubt.
  • The figure wore a black cloak with the hood pulled over his or her face, making it impossible for the young man to see any distinct features.
Synonyms
head covering, cowl, snood, headscarf, amice
1.1A separate garment similar to a hood, worn over a college gown or a surplice to indicate the wearer’s degree.
More example sentences
  • Excited graduates walk up and down, parading their finery of gowns, hoods and mortarboards seemingly oblivious to the fact that these are colonial trappings.
  • It was Graduation day at de Montfort on Thursday, with hundreds of young people wearing their gowns and colourful hoods, and dozens of doting parents taking pictures.
  • During the afternoon ceremony, master's degrees were conferred on 510 new graduates wearing brightly colored hoods denoting their major.
1.2 Falconry A leather covering for a hawk’s head.
More example sentences
  • There is a falcon hood - the brown leather dome, crowned with a tuft of feathers, is brittle like a little skull - and an envelope contains a watch.
  • Hoods are used to keep the bird calm during transport.
  • It's the same principal falconers use when they put a hood over a falcon's head.
2A thing resembling a hood in shape or use, in particular.
More example sentences
  • The charmer then makes rhythmic, elegant motions with the horn, which is correspondingly followed by the hood of the cobra.
  • Hoping for a procession of migrating raptors, I stretched out on the hood of my car.
  • He had processed a patient's bacterial culture without a safety hood.
2.1North American A metal part covering the engine of an automobile.
More example sentences
  • Additionally, the car's hood, doors, fenders, trunk lid, engine and suspension are aluminum.
  • Under the hood, the engine is very similar to that of the earlier S300 model.
  • Often when dealing with parts of the engine, or the hard-to-reach spots under the hood, proper tools are required.
2.2A canopy to protect users of machinery or to remove fumes from it.
More example sentences
  • Range hoods and fans remove grease and moisture from cooking, and so collect dirt.
  • In the real case, it is likely that combustion products would have been removed by the extraction hood, even after the fan had failed.
  • And all range hoods require occasional cleaning or replacing of the grease-covered metal filters.
2.3A hoodlike structure or marking on the head or neck of an animal.
More example sentences
  • In breeding plumage, the adult has a dark hood with a black eye and bill.
  • To ward off trouble, cobras can rear up, and they have hoods that expand out like a half umbrella to make themselves appear bigger and scarier than they actually are.
2.4The upper part of the flower of a plant such as a dead-nettle.
More example sentences
  • White spots on the hood may be absent or occur in patches.
2.5British A folding waterproof cover of an automobile, baby carriage, etc.
More example sentences
  • One drawback about the folding hard top is that you can't get luggage out when the hood is folded down.
  • If the toy you choose has a clip, it will enable you to attach it to the front of the pram hood above the baby's head.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Put a hood on or over.
More example sentences
  • He said the accused had also known she would recognise him so he added to her trauma by hooding himself, and to make sure he was not seen, had thrown a towel over her head.
  • In Camp Delta, this means shackling inmates for 20 hours a day, while hooding and beating them.
  • These sources say the prisoners there are hooded from the moment they are captured.

Origin

Old English hōd; related to Dutch hoed, German Hut 'hat', also to hat.

Derivatives

hoodless

adjective
More example sentences
  • Inmates practising paganism will be allowed a hoodless robe, incense and a piece of religious jewellery among their personal possessions.
  • Another cloaked figure, this one hoodless, burst into the clearing.
  • The young man was wearing a hoodless poncho over his fine suit.

hoodlike

adjective
More example sentences
  • It refers to the way the leaves partly enclose the flowers, forming a hood-like structure over them.
  • He described this structure as a hood-like covering.
  • For headgear there was a hood-like cap with side-pieces which could be brought forward to cover the mouth.

Definition of hood in:

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Word of the day animalcule
Pronunciation: ˌanɪˈmalkjuːl
noun
a microscopic animal

There are 3 definitions of hood in English:

hood2

Syllabification: hood
Pronunciation: /ho͝od
 
/

noun

informal , chiefly North American
A gangster or similar violent criminal.
More example sentences
  • It's a film that focuses on ethics, be they pure or prurient, and how criminals and hoods can still require a sense of justice and fair play.
  • His connections to senior criminal organisations and well-placed hoods are known to police.
  • She also is fascinated by the hoods and low-lifes that Nick looks up as he meanders his way through the task of finding Clyde Wynant.

Origin

1930s: abbreviation of hoodlum.

Definition of hood in:

There are 3 definitions of hood in English:

hood3

Syllabification: hood
Pronunciation: /ho͝od
 
/
(also 'hood)

noun

informal , chiefly US
A neighborhood, especially one’s own neighborhood: I’ve lived in the hood for 15 years
More example sentences
  • They had ghastly visions of the boys in the hood heading for their neighborhoods next.
  • If you live in the hood, or are passing through Russian Hill and need to check mail on your laptop, Nook would be a worthy, comfortable place to stop.
  • Check them out, and if they play live in your hood go see them, you won't be disappointed.

Origin

1970s: shortening of neighborhood.

Definition of hood in: