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hydraulic

Syllabification: hy·drau·lic
Pronunciation: /hīˈdrôlik
 
/

Definition of hydraulic in English:

adjective

1Denoting, relating to, or operated by a liquid moving in a confined space under pressure: hydraulic fluid hydraulic lifting gear
More example sentences
  • After we shot down the catapult, we saw a sheen of hydraulic fluid covering the pressure bulkhead in the back of the aircraft.
  • That includes using non-toxic hydraulic oils for his machinery, and synthetic engine oils all around in the hopes of reducing maintenance downtime.
  • Until now, conventional hydraulic oil would break down sooner, leaving your machine's metal abrasively scraping against metal.
2Of or relating to the science of hydraulics.
Example sentences
  • The eleven imperial water mill visits testify to the founders' keen interest in the science of hydraulic engineering.
  • Mitchell reports that further hydraulic analysis will be conducted within the next two weeks by the Water Resources Hydrology department.
  • Anatomical measurements were done on samples previously used for the analysis of hydraulic parameters.
3(Of cement) hardening under water.
Example sentences
  • If you see cracks in the walls leaking, some of these can be repaired with hydraulic cement or crack injection.
  • Nevertheless, Henry knew research was expected of him, and he began investigating the chemical reactions involved in the setting of hydraulic cements.

Origin

early 17th century: via Latin from Greek hudraulikos, from hudro- 'water' + aulos 'pipe'.

More
  • water from (Old English):

    The people living around the Black Sea more than 5 000 years ago had a word for water. We do not know exactly what it was, but it was probably the source for the words used for ‘water’ in many European languages, past and present. In Old English it was wæter. The Greek was hudōr, the source of words like hydraulic (mid 17th century) and hydrotherapy (late 19th century). The same root led to the formation of Latin unda ‘wave’, as in inundate (late 18th century), abound (Middle English) (from Latin abundare ‘overflow’), and undulate (mid 17th century), Russian voda (the source of vodka), German Wasser, and the English words wet (Old English) and otter (Old English). Of the first water means ‘unsurpassed’. The three highest grades into which diamonds or pearls could be classified used to be called waters, but only first water, the top one, is found today, describing a completely flawless gem. An equivalent term is found in many European languages, and all are thought to come from the Arabic word for water, , which also meant ‘shine or splendour’, presumably from the appearance of very pure water. People and things other than gems began to be described as of the first water in the 1820s. Nowadays the phrase is rarely used as a compliment: in a letter written in 1950, P.G. Wodehouse commented disparagingly on J. M. Barrie's play The Admirable Crichton: ‘I remember being entranced with it in 1904 or whenever it was, but now it seems like a turkey of the first water.’ If you study a duck shaking its wings after diving for food you will see the point of water off a duck's back, used since the 1820s of a potentially hurtful remark that has no apparent effect. The water forms into beads and simply slides off the bird's waterproof feathers, leaving the duck dry. Water under the bridge refers to events that are in the past and should no longer to be regarded as important. Similar phrases are recorded since the beginning of the 20th century. A North American variant is water over the dam. The first uses of waterlogged, in the late 18th century, referred to ships that were so flooded with water that they became heavy and unmanageable, and no better than a log floating in the sea. A watershed, a ridge of land that separates waters flowing to different rivers or seas, has nothing to do with garden sheds but means ‘ridge of high ground’ and is connected with shed (Old English) meaning ‘discard’.

Derivatives

hydraulically

1
Pronunciation: /-(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • A hydraulic hammer is basically a hydraulically powered reciprocating piston inside of a body.
  • It's essentially a manual gearbox; the engine's torque is transferred mechanically, rather than hydraulically as in an automatic transmission.
  • The wheels are fitted with dual circuit hydraulically operated disc brakes and anti-skid braking.

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