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idyll

Syllabification: i·dyll
Pronunciation: /ˈīdl
 
/

Definition of idyll in English:

noun

1An extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or scene, typically an idealized or unsustainable one: the rural idyll remains strongly evocative in most industrialized societies
More example sentences
  • It might be associations, such as memories of holidays, pastoral idylls, the peacefulness, the slower pace, or a whole imagined way of life.
  • The ‘quality of life index’ suggests the happiest Scots live in the Highlands where the rural idyll of low crime, a strong sense of community and good health remains largely intact.
  • Goth, however, was one style that did achieve some form of visibility - although you'll note that I say the late 1980s because, like most things, it took a few years to make its way out to our rural idyll.
1.1A short description in verse or prose of a picturesque scene or incident, especially in rustic life.
Example sentences
  • If the first half of the novel is an idyll, the second half shifts to romance.
  • Patchett takes her time getting there, but by the climax of her story, you find yourself hoping that the idyll will - somehow, magically - last.
  • Clearly the poetry is more than music, idylls and dreams; I would argue that Hyde knows full well that language makes itself part of what it refers to.

Origin

late 16th century (in the Latin form): from Latin idyllium, from Greek eidullion, diminutive of eidos 'form, picture'.

Words that rhyme with idyll

gerbil • wind chill • Churchill

Definition of idyll in:

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