There are 2 main definitions of impost in English:

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impost 1

Syllabification: im·post
Pronunciation: /ˈimpōst/

noun

1A tax or similar compulsory payment.
Example sentences
  • Article I, Section 8 allows for the collection of ‘taxes, duties, imposts and excises’ but only ‘for revenue necessary’ to finance the government and not to protect any business or industry from international competition.
  • In the words of Article I, Section 8, Congress had the general power ‘to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises.’
  • More specifically, the Estonian model, like the other eastern European states with flat taxes, retains social security payments as a separate impost.
1.1 Horse Racing The weight carried by a horse as a handicap.
Example sentences
  • But he will skip the race because of the impost, as will stablemate Mutafaweq, who was assigned 131 pounds.
  • True Direction's impost worried trainer Carlos Morales before the race.
  • With the departure of Tranquility Lake, Tout Charmant will carry the high weight of 120 pounds, with Caffe Latte's 117 the second highest impost.

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French (earlier form of impôt), from medieval Latin impostus, from Latin impositus, past participle of imponere (see impose).

Words that rhyme with impost

Freepost • guidepost

Definition of impost in:

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There are 2 main definitions of impost in English:

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impost 2 Syllabification: im·post
Pronunciation: /ˈimpōst/

noun

Architecture
The top course of a pillar that supports an arch.
Example sentences
  • This space was ornamented with low relief sculpture of winged sun disks and wreaths located on the pedimented impost blocks between the arches.
  • The pedimented and ornamented impost blocks between the arches used in his earlier capitols were notably absent.
  • Inside, the most striking feature is the Saxon chancel arch, with its through stones (up the sides), imposts (off which the arch springs), and through-stone voussoirs forming the arch itself.

Origin

Late 15th century: from Italian imposta, feminine past participle of imporre, from Latin imponere (see impose).

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