Definition of improvident in English:

improvident

Syllabification: im·prov·i·dent
Pronunciation: /ˌimˈprävəd(ə)nt
 
/

adjective

Not having or showing foresight; spendthrift or thoughtless: improvident and undisciplined behavior
More example sentences
  • The wives are greedy and the men, in the absence of any well-regulated women, are recklessly improvident.
  • Now that our government has implicated us in this regrettable, improvident and illegal war - we are obliged to make a substantial commitment to reconstruction.
  • Or put another way, it's stealing from tomorrow to make up for the improvident ways of today.
Synonyms
spendthrift, thriftless, wasteful, prodigal, profligate, extravagant, lavish, free-spending, immoderate, excessive; imprudent, irresponsible, careless, reckless, heedless

Derivatives

improvidence

noun
More example sentences
  • Poverty isn't something that all people bring upon themselves by their own improvidence.
  • Hearst's inclusiveness as a collector, coupled with his improvidence as a purchaser, contributed to an indebtedness of $100 million in 1937-a predicament so grave that he had to sell more than half his art collection.
  • Some commentators still blamed working men's improvidence for forcing their wives out to work, but social investigators increasingly documented the fact that most men simply could not earn a breadwinner wage.

improvidently

adverb
More example sentences
  • Democrats, notoriously cold toward losing candidates they have improvidently nominated, resemble Dallas fans as described by quarterback Roger Staubach: " Cowboy fans love you, win or tie.
  • We do not seek to pull down improvidently all structures of society, but to erect balustrades upon the stairway of life, which will prevent helpless or foolish people from falling into the abyss.

Definition of improvident in:

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnɒm(ə)ləs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected