Definition of inchoative in English:

inchoative

Syllabification: in·cho·a·tive
Pronunciation: /inˈkōədiv
 
/

adjective

Grammar
Denoting an aspect of a verb expressing the beginning of an action, typically one occurring of its own accord. In many English verbs, inchoative uses alternate systematically with causative uses. Compare with ergative.
More example sentences
  • A hundred and forty years later, the inchoative generalization of the verb has shown up in the New York Times.
  • However, there are some positively evaluated conditions in common inchoative collocations with go: go live, go platinum, go blonde.

noun

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An inchoative verb.
More example sentences
  • Is he saying that our genes have been programmed by evolution to resist inchoatives that involve becoming lost?
  • The fact that some idioms are restricted to causatives, while others are restricted to inchoatives, lends new support to the view that the two derivations are distinct.
  • It is argued however that the Hebrew inchoatives do not create any problems to the LMH.

Definition of inchoative in:

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