Definition of incite in English:

incite

Syllabification: in·cite
Pronunciation: /inˈsīt
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

incitation

Pronunciation: /ˌinsīˈtāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • She was dealt felony charges for incitation to riot and setting a puppet on fire (charges of which she claimed to be innocent) and saddled with a four-hundred-thousand dollar bail.
  • ‘Israel welcomes the efforts of the US to include in the Security Council resolution a section calling for the immediate end to terrorism and to incitations to violence,’ he said.
  • The American attorney who was the target of the threats, stated today, ‘I very much appreciate that the French justice system had the courage to convict him for his incitations to murder and his insults.’

inciter

noun
More example sentences
  • All populist right-wing movements, inciters to violence and hatred, are adept in the language of Grievance.
  • But the possibility that apathy may subvert anarchy does not absolve its inciters from responsibility.
  • All along we've thought that something subversive was in our midst, perhaps a maker of effigies, or an inciter of revolutions.

Origin

late 15th century: from French inciter, from Latin incitare, from in- 'toward' + citare 'rouse'.

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