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incommode

Syllabification: in·com·mode
Pronunciation: /ˌinkəˈmōd
 
/

Definition of incommode in English:

verb

[with object] formal
Inconvenience (someone): they are incommoded by the traffic
More example sentences
  • The latter was the sector most incommoded by Russianization, for the kinds of jobs it fancied required good command of the Russian language (and sometimes, officially or unofficially, Russian birth).
  • Whether sleeping rough in the remotest places or enjoying the fauniferous hospitality of the locals in inhabited ones, being incommoded was somehow integral to the experience.
  • A meeting at the Star and Garter in 1774 drew up new rules, with 22-yard pitches, 4-ball overs, stumping, and no-balling: ‘the wicket-keeper should not by any noise incommode the striker.’

Origin

late 16th century: from French incommoder or Latin incommodare, from in- 'not' + commodus 'convenient'.

Definition of incommode in:

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