Definition of indiscriminate in English:

indiscriminate

Syllabification: in·dis·crim·i·nate
Pronunciation: /ˌindiˈskrimənit
 
/

adjective

  • 1Done at random or without careful judgment: the indiscriminate killing of civilians
    More example sentences
    • The new wave has ratcheted savagery and indiscriminate killing to unthinkable levels.
    • Now the attacks are becoming more random, brutal and indiscriminate.
    • Algeria became caught in a cycle of violence, which became increasingly random and indiscriminate.
    Synonyms
    nonselective, unselective, undiscriminating, uncritical, aimless, hit-or-miss, haphazard, random, arbitrary, unsystematic, undirected; wholesale, general, sweeping, blanket; thoughtless, unthinking, inconsiderate, casual, careless
  • 1.1(Of a person) not using or exercising discrimination: she was indiscriminate with her affections

Derivatives

indiscriminately

adverb
More example sentences
  • Racist abuse was hurled indiscriminately from both sides.
  • Aristotle says that we must give wisely, and not indiscriminately, and I do not have money to throw away on swindlers.
  • Left unchecked, viruses could indiscriminately attack the body's cells.

indiscriminateness

noun
More example sentences
  • It is due to its indiscriminateness that human sexuality is inherently prone to perversion.
  • The screenplay delivers an ambitious epic that is dense in a way that indicates not indiscriminateness but rather the existence of a highly personal internal logic.
  • He pondered the increase in indiscriminateness among terrorists, and he posited several possible reasons accounting for this upsurge.

indiscrimination

Pronunciation: /-ˌskriməˈnāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • I'm not sure my point was about marshalling the judgment of history so much as resisting the indiscrimination of contemporaneity.
  • What continues to remain in our mind and memory is the hope for a new dawn of promises, free from atrocities and indiscriminations.
  • Centrality, extremism, and indiscrimination all manifest themselves in the assigned raw score standard deviations and rater fit statistics.

Origin

late 16th century (in the sense 'haphazard, not selective'): from in-1 'not' + Latin discriminatus, past participle of discriminare (see discriminate).

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Pronunciation: skəʊʃ
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a small amount; a little