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inhume Syllabification: in·hume
Pronunciation: /inˈ(h)yo͞om/

Definition of inhume in English:

verb

[with object]
Bury: no hand his bones shall gather or inhume
More example sentences
  • It is known that over 5,000 Sarmatians from this area came to Britain after the Marcomannic wars in AD 175; but it is unlikely that the people at Brougham were Sarmatians, as the latter inhumed their dead.
  • Birth and death, however, collide in a remarkable way in a number of tombs in the Greek world in which a woman is found inhumed or cremated together with a fetus or neonate.
  • It was the living that inhumed the dead, after all.

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin inhumare, from in- 'into' + humus 'ground'.

Derivatives

inhumation

1
Pronunciation: /inˈ(h)yo͞om/
noun
Example sentences
  • The trend from cremation to inhumation in burial practice may also be consciously copying the changing Roman fashion.
  • In late Roman times there was an increased diversity in burial practice and examples of both cremation and inhumation are found.
  • Also from the north came the use of cremation instead of inhumation, around 1200 BC.

Words that rhyme with inhume

abloom, assume, backroom, bloom, Blum, boom, broom, brume, combe, consume, doom, entomb, exhume, flume, foredoom, fume, gloom, Hume, illume, Khartoum, khoum, loom, neume, perfume, plume, presume, resume, rheum, room, spume, subsume, tomb, vroom, whom, womb, zoom

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