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inimical

Syllabification: in·im·i·cal
Pronunciation: /iˈnimək(ə)l
 
/

Definition of inimical in English:

adjective

1Tending to obstruct or harm: actions inimical to our interests
More example sentences
  • The important question is what can be done to counter political attacks which are inimical to the effective operation of the judicial system?
  • Imagination is not greatly encouraged by human systems of organization because it is by nature free; it is beyond established control, inimical to chains, can't be enslaved, organized or taxed, depends upon no institution.
  • The state has also passed laws that are inimical to the short-term interests of particular capitalists, but necessary in the longer-term interests of capitalism itself - for example, health and safety legislation.
1.1Unfriendly; hostile: an inimical alien power
More example sentences
  • What waited them at the end of such perilous journey was a life of celibacy, near total isolation from home, inimical climate and unfriendly natives.
  • Because leaven is a common metaphor for the ‘evil inclination’ in Judaism, Jesus here insinuates their complicity with the inimical powers that oppress the people.
  • Shocked, Dubble slipped on a sheaf of papers, screeched and struck his head against one of the cabinets, and when he recovered to his feet he regarded his Commander with a cold, inimical glower.

Origin

early 16th century: from late Latin inimicalis, from Latin inimicus (see enemy).

More
  • enemy from (Middle English):

    An enemy is not your friend. So far, so obvious, but this is, in fact, the derivation of the word. It came into the language at the end of the 13th century from Old French enemi, from Latin inimicus, which was based on in- meaning ‘not’ and amicus ‘friend’. Inimicus is the source of inimical (late 17th century) or ‘hostile’, and amicus of amicable (mid 16th century) or ‘friendly’.

Derivatives

inimically

1
Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • The warning angered lawmakers and public officials who said the U.S. acted inimically against a traditional ally.
  • They could meet another species which is inimically superior, and lose faith in themselves.
  • In our context, the Diocese consists of 22 different ethnic groups, some of which are inimically inclined towards others.

Words that rhyme with inimical

rhythmicalseismical

Definition of inimical in:

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