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innovate

Syllabification: in·no·vate
Pronunciation: /ˈinəˌvāt
 
/

Definition of innovate in English:

verb

[no object]
1Make changes in something established, especially by introducing new methods, ideas, or products: the company’s failure to diversify and innovate competitively
More example sentences
  • Some expressed the view that fewer and fewer employers are willing to take risks with ideas or to innovate.
  • That means the Koreans must keep innovating and introduce automation to stay competitive.
  • Increased competition means producers must innovate and improve constantly.
1.1 [with object] Introduce (something new, especially a product): innovating new products, developing existing ones
More example sentences
  • Decrease hospital stays by innovating new products.
  • Sometimes it's hard to imagine that there's still room to innovate your product or service.
  • The drive to constantly innovate product and process technology is strongly visible.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin innovat- 'renewed, altered', from the verb innovare, from in- 'into' + novare 'make new' (from novus 'new').

More
  • new from (Old English):

    New comes from the same root as Latin novus, the source of the English words innovate (mid 16th century), novel, novice (Middle English), and renovate (early 16th century). The noun news (Late Middle English) is simply the plural of new. It came into use as a translation of Old French noveles or medieval Latin nova, meaning ‘new things’. The proverb no news is good news, although modern-sounding, can be traced back at least as far as the time of King James I, who wrote in 1616 that ‘No newis is bettir then evill newis’. It may be based on the Italian phrase Nulla nuova, buona nova (‘No news, good news’). Newfangled (Middle English) is from new and a second element related to an Old English word meaning ‘to take’.

Derivatives

innovatory

1
Pronunciation: /-vəˌtôrē/
adjective
Example sentences
  • That is why he deliberately left so few personal records behind; that explains the innovatory brilliance of his greatest plays.
  • Luther's unprecedented reconstruction of church imaging was innovatory in proposing the form that altarpieces should take.
  • The factors that led to the innovatory creation of works of this sort in the 1910s could be described in many ways.

Words that rhyme with innovate

aggravate • rotavate

Definition of innovate in:

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