Definition of inspiration in English:

inspiration

Syllabification: in·spi·ra·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌinspəˈrāSHən
 
/

noun

  • 1The process of being mentally stimulated to do or feel something, especially to do something creative: Helen had one of her flashes of inspiration the history of fashion has provided designers with invaluable inspiration
    More example sentences
    • He kicked 21 points and, more importantly, provided the creative inspiration that led directly to at least two of the Aussies' tries.
    • They also looked at stories by popular authors like Roald Dahl for a flash of creative inspiration.
    • Hence the emphasis on communication in her books, and the emphasis on artistic inspiration as a flash of objective vision.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1The quality of being inspired, especially when evident in something: a rare moment of inspiration in an otherwise dull display
    More example sentences
    • Colleagues praise her qualities of enthusiasm, energy and inspiration.
    • That question and her answer proved to be a rare moment of inspiration in a day of mayhem and murder.
    • Moments of fervent inspiration are also part of this very short but telling musical prayer.
  • 1.2A person or thing that inspires: he is an inspiration to everyone
    More example sentences
    • Drawing inspiration from real life incidents, he makes hard-hitting films that revolve around issues concerning society.
    • Draw inspiration from what's available and what you like.
    • Drawing inspiration from his words, young Scottish climbers of the post-war generation strove to do some exploring of their own.
    Synonyms
    guiding light, example, model, muse, motivation, encouragement, influence, spur, stimulus, lift, boost, incentive, impulse, catalyst
  • 1.3A sudden brilliant, creative, or timely idea: then I had an inspiration
    More example sentences
    • All of which will remind you that moments of revelation, like sudden inspirations, should always be handled quite gingerly.
    • You watch the show, you leave with a thought, a concept, an idea, an inspiration, something like that.
    • All of a sudden inspiration struck - I would call it Jabba.
    Synonyms
    bright idea, revelation, flash
    informal brainwave, brainstorm, eureka moment
  • 1.4The divine influence believed to have led to the writing of the Bible.
    More example sentences
    • In 1782 he published his History of the Corruptions of Christianity, in which he rejected the Trinity, predestination and the divine inspiration of the Bible.
    • After a childhood spent in his native Brittany he studied for the priesthood in Paris, but withdrew because of doubts about the divinity of Jesus and the divine inspiration of the Bible.
    • The second item measures belief in the divine inspiration and literal truth of the Bible.
  • 2The drawing in of breath; inhalation.
    More example sentences
    • It is easiest to hear breath sounds during inspiration and expiratory sounds are less well heard.
    • Apnea duration was defined as the time between the end of inspiration of the breath preceding a central apnea and the onset of inspiration of the breath terminating the apnea.
    • The process of taking air into the lungs is called inspiration, or inhalation, and the process of breathing it out is called expiration, or exhalation.
  • 2.1An act of breathing in; an inhalation.
    More example sentences
    • Moreover, quiet breathing is regularly interrupted by deep inspirations in which tidal volume at least doubles and the forces on the tissue significantly increase.
    • The intrinsic elasticity of the airways would still allow the airway tree to distend with inspirations and relax with expiration.
    • Children were asked to take a maximal inspiration, followed immediately by a maximal forced expiratory maneuver without a pause in between.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'divine guidance'): via Old French from late Latin inspiratio(n-), from the verb inspirare (see inspire).

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