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inundate

Syllabification: in·un·date
Pronunciation: /ˈinənˌdāt
 
/

Definition of inundate in English:

verb

[with object]
1Overwhelm (someone) with things or people to be dealt with: we’ve been inundated with complaints from listeners
More example sentences
  • You may be surprised to learn that we are not inundated with complaints from people living in the surrounding area there is no trouble.
  • We were inundated with requests from people to help them find their transport.
  • In a world where people are inundated with information from the media this seems naive.
Synonyms
overwhelm, overrun, overload, bog down, swamp, besiege, snow under, bombard, glut
2Flood: the islands may be the first to be inundated as sea levels rise
More example sentences
  • Here in Naples, Hurricane Wilma caused flooding, including inundating a parking garage.
  • The building of the canal is expected to control the annual floods that inundate many parts of the capital, causing much loss of life and property.
  • When the precipitation rate increases in Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina, floods inundate southern China and Bangladesh and drought hits some of the remotest Indian villages.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin inundat- 'flooded', from the verb inundare, from in- 'into, upon' + undare 'to flow' (from unda 'a wave').

More
  • water from (Old English):

    The people living around the Black Sea more than 5 000 years ago had a word for water. We do not know exactly what it was, but it was probably the source for the words used for ‘water’ in many European languages, past and present. In Old English it was wæter. The Greek was hudōr, the source of words like hydraulic (mid 17th century) and hydrotherapy (late 19th century). The same root led to the formation of Latin unda ‘wave’, as in inundate (late 18th century), abound (Middle English) (from Latin abundare ‘overflow’), and undulate (mid 17th century), Russian voda (the source of vodka), German Wasser, and the English words wet (Old English) and otter (Old English). Of the first water means ‘unsurpassed’. The three highest grades into which diamonds or pearls could be classified used to be called waters, but only first water, the top one, is found today, describing a completely flawless gem. An equivalent term is found in many European languages, and all are thought to come from the Arabic word for water, , which also meant ‘shine or splendour’, presumably from the appearance of very pure water. People and things other than gems began to be described as of the first water in the 1820s. Nowadays the phrase is rarely used as a compliment: in a letter written in 1950, P.G. Wodehouse commented disparagingly on J. M. Barrie's play The Admirable Crichton: ‘I remember being entranced with it in 1904 or whenever it was, but now it seems like a turkey of the first water.’ If you study a duck shaking its wings after diving for food you will see the point of water off a duck's back, used since the 1820s of a potentially hurtful remark that has no apparent effect. The water forms into beads and simply slides off the bird's waterproof feathers, leaving the duck dry. Water under the bridge refers to events that are in the past and should no longer to be regarded as important. Similar phrases are recorded since the beginning of the 20th century. A North American variant is water over the dam. The first uses of waterlogged, in the late 18th century, referred to ships that were so flooded with water that they became heavy and unmanageable, and no better than a log floating in the sea. A watershed, a ridge of land that separates waters flowing to different rivers or seas, has nothing to do with garden sheds but means ‘ridge of high ground’ and is connected with shed (Old English) meaning ‘discard’.

Words that rhyme with inundate

updatefecundate

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