Definition of inveigle in English:

inveigle

Syllabification: in·vei·gle
Pronunciation: /inˈvāɡəl
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Persuade (someone) to do something by means of deception or flattery: we cannot inveigle him into putting pen to paper
More example sentences
  • The ego's greatest triumph is to inveigle us into believing its best interests are our best interests, and even into identifying our very survival with its own.
  • Only when she has managed to inveigle him into a marriage would the process of dismantling and rebuilding his character begin.
  • Emmy had even inveigled him to resume his incessant smoking once more.
Synonyms
1.1 (inveigle oneself or one's way into) Gain entrance to (a place) by persuading (someone) with deception or flattery.
More example sentences
  • He said that they made him feel welcome and he had an ulterior motive in inveigling himself into their company.
  • In an echo of Potter's earlier ‘visitation’ plays, Kitchen's character, Martin, inveigles himself into people's lives and homes by cold reading them like a stage hypnotist.
  • In this case the protagonists are two brothers - weak, aimless Aston and aggressive, controlling Mick - and Davies, the tramp who inveigles himself into their lives.

Origin

late 15th century (in the sense 'beguile, deceive'; formerly also as enveigle): from Anglo-Norman French envegler, alteration of Old French aveugler 'to blind', from aveugle 'blind'.

Derivatives

inveiglement

noun
More example sentences
  • Spokes said it with an air of either respect or inveiglement.

Definition of inveigle in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: niːˈɒt(ə)ni
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal